Student Well-Being

Dirty Cheering?

April 05, 2005 1 min read

State Rep. Al Edwards of Texas decided he had seen enough.

The Democrat from Houston said that too many cheerleaders’ dances at high school events had become too risqué, and that constituents had begun to complain.

That’s why he introduced legislation in the Texas House this year that aims to do something about it. The bill, believed to be the first of its kind in the nation, would encourage school districts to restrict sexually oriented dancing by cheerleaders and other groups at school events.

“It has just been allowed to go too far,” Mr. Edwards said in an interview last week. Provocative dances contribute to the “exploitation of our young girls,” he added.

Mr. Edwards said he wants to keep a provision in his bill that would strip public schools of state money if they didn’t follow the spirit of the law. But he admitted that the funding provision probably would not pass.

“We know the people in the school system know what to do,” Mr. Edwards said.

As of late last week, there had not been a vote on the bill.

Cheerleaders and others who strut their stuff at games and other school events might prefer that oversight of their dancing remain at the school level—and certainly outside the influence of state politicians.

Martha Selman, the director of marketing for the Garland, Texas-based National Cheerleaders Association, said she was aware of Rep. Edwards’ bill, and had not seen the likes of it before.

“I’ve not heard of any state doing this,” Ms. Selman said. “In principle, we agree with the desire to prohibit sexually suggestive material in school routines. I think we would be better served by having education for the coaches versus enacting legislation that could endanger school funding.”

School leaders should ensure that adults who coach cheerleading and dance squads are well trained through the National Cheerleaders Association or similar organizations, Ms. Selman added.

Coaches, she continued, are trained to help students learn cheerleading safely and to teach responsibility in devising routines that are appropriate for young audiences. “Through the credentialing,” she said, “they get resources; they get training on how to create choreography that can still be eye-catching but doesn’t have to resort to shock value.”

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Reading & Literacy Webinar
Addressing Learning Loss: What Schools Need to Accelerate Reading Instruction in K-3
When K-3 students return to classrooms this fall, there will be huge gaps in foundational reading skills. Does your school or district need a plan to address learning loss and accelerate student growth? In this
Content provided by PDX Reading
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Equity & Diversity Webinar
Culturally Relevant Pedagogy to Advance Educational Equity
Schools are welcoming students back into buildings for full-time in-person instruction in a few short weeks and now is the perfect time to take a hard look at both our practices and systems to build
Content provided by PowerMyLearning
Classroom Technology Webinar Making Big Technology Decisions: Advice for District Leaders, Principals, and Teachers
Educators at all levels make decisions that can have a huge impact on students. That’s especially true when it comes to the use of technology, which was activated like never before to help students learn

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Student Well-Being Spotlight Spotlight on Student Health & Safety
In this Spotlight, assess what the data says and how educators can play a part in protecting their students, and more.
Student Well-Being Thousands of Kids Lost Parents to COVID-19. Schools Must Prepare to Help the Grieving
While some may view the back-to-school season as a return to “normal,” for those students who’ve lost someone, it will feel anything but.
9 min read
Vickie Quarles, a widow in Memphis, Tenn., lost her husband to COVID-19 in December 2020. She is now raising their five daughters alone. Her older daughter, Alyssa, 18, comforts her in their home.
Vickie Quarles, a widow in Memphis, Tenn., lost her husband to COVID-19 in December 2020. She is now raising their five daughters alone. Her oldest daughter, Alyssa, 18, comforts her in their home.
Karen Pulfer Focht for Education Week
Student Well-Being Nation's Pediatricians Call for All Students, Staff to Wear Masks in School
Countering recent guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control, the physicians say even vaccinated students should wear face coverings
5 min read
Students are reminded to wear a mask amidst other chalk drawings on the sidewalk as they arrive for the first day of school at Union High School in Tulsa, Okla., on Aug. 24, 2020.
A sidewalk-chalk drawing reminds students to wear a mask as they arrive for the first day of school last August at Union High School in Tulsa, Okla.
Mike Simons/Tulsa World via AP
Student Well-Being The Pandemic and Politics Made Life Especially Rough for LGBTQ Youth, Survey Finds
More than 80 percent of 13- to 24-year-olds who say they are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning said 2020 was very hard.
2 min read
People wave pride flags and hold signs during a rally in support of LGBTQ students at Ridgeline High School, Wednesday, April 14, 2021, in Millville, Utah. Students and school district officials in Utah are outraged after a high school student ripped down a pride flag to the cheers of other students during diversity week. A rally was held the following day in response to show support for the LGBTQ community.
People rally in support of LGBTQ students at Ridgeline High School on April 14, 2021, in Millville, Utah. The day before a high school student ripped down a pride flag to the cheers of other students during diversity week.
Eli Lucero/The Herald Journal via AP