Equity & Diversity Report Roundup

Child Poverty

By Mary C. Breaden — January 22, 2008 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

U.S. Census Bureau’s 2005 Poverty Estimates

The number of U.S. children living in poverty has increased from 13 million to 13.4 million since 2004, according to the latest report from the Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates, a division of the U.S. Census Bureau that calculates annual income for states, counties, and school districts.

Most striking was the rise in the number of children under the age of 5 living in poverty, increasing from 4.1 million in 2004 to 4.2 million in 2005. The highest percentages of children in this age group living in poverty were found in Louisiana, Mississippi, and the District of Columbia.

The report based its calculations on federal tax returns from families in each of the nation’s 14,000 school districts, and also looked at Food Stamp participation.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the January 23, 2008 edition of Education Week

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Assessment Webinar
The State of Assessment in K-12 Education
What is the impact of assessment on K-12 education? What does that mean for administrators, teachers and most importantly—students?
Content provided by Instructure
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Centering the Whole Child in School Improvement Planning and Redesign
Learn how leading with equity and empathy yield improved sense of belonging, attendance, and promotion rate to 10th grade.

Content provided by Panorama
Teaching Profession Webinar Examining the Evidence: Supports to Promote Teacher Well-Being
Rates of work dissatisfaction are on the rise among teachers. Grappling with an increased workload due to the pandemic and additional stressors have exacerbated feelings of burnout and demoralization. Given these challenges, what can the

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Equity & Diversity Opinion 6 Strategies for Promoting Diversity and Inclusion at Your School
When pursuing DEI work, start from the premise that bias is normal, writes Fonati Abrokwa.
Fonati Abrokwa
4 min read
Illustration of hands with different skin colors putting together brightly colored puzzle pieces.
melitas/iStock
Equity & Diversity Pride Flags and Black Lives Matter Signs in the Classroom: Supportive Symbols or Propaganda?
Some districts ban Pride flags and Black Lives Matters signs in the classroom. Teachers are pushing back.
8 min read
Flags are displayed as the Newberg, Ore. teachers gather with community members ahead of the Newberg School Board vote on whether to ban Black Lives Matter and Pride flags at the school in September, 2021.
Flags are displayed as the Newberg Education Association gathers with community members ahead of the Newberg School Board vote on whether to ban Black Lives Matter and Pride flags at the school, Tuesday, Sept. 28, 2021, in Newberg, Ore.
Beth Nakamura/The Oregonian via AP
Equity & Diversity From Our Research Center Do Educators Think Critical Race Theory Should Be Taught in Class? We Asked
An EdWeek poll shows educators are split over whether children should be taught that racism is systemic and embedded in American policies.
2 min read
Photo of elementary students raising their hands in classroom.
skynesher/Getty
Equity & Diversity Students Embrace a Wide Range of Gender Identities. Most School Data Systems Don't
Districts like Philadelphia aren't waiting for the federal government to make their student information systems more inclusive.
9 min read
Illustration showing 4 individuals next to their pronouns (he/him, they/them, and she/her)
iStock/Getty Images Plus