Low-Income Students

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Teaching Opinion 3 Steps Teachers Can Take to Value Students’ Marginalized Identities
Lower-income students have strengths that often go unrecognized. Here’s how to structure lesson plans that capitalize on them.
David M. Silverman, August 17, 2022
3 min read
Rear view of elementary age students seated at their desks facing mid 40s Black teacher standing at chalkboard with focus on foreground boys.
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Teaching Some Students Are Routinely Denied Challenging Work. The Pandemic Made That Worse
An increase in the use of lower-level reading passages threatens to exacerbate academic gaps.
Sarah Schwartz, August 16, 2022
4 min read
Girl holding food tray in school cafeteria
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Student Well-Being Free School Meal Waivers Are Ending Soon. What Educators Need to Know
The USDA waivers allowed all students to get free school meals and helped sustain cafeterias in the pandemic.
Libby Stanford, June 2, 2022
4 min read
Equity & Diversity Quiz Quiz Yourself: How Much Do You Know About Broadband Inclusivity?
Answer 7 questions to discover what you know about broadband inclusivity.
February 14, 2022
Helina Thorp, right, 14, expresses frustration while unsuccessfully trying to log in to her school distance-learning classes in Placerville, Calif., after Pacific Gas & Electric intentionally shut off power to prevent wildfires amid high winds in September 2020.
Helina Thorp, right, 14, expresses frustration while unsuccessfully trying to log in to her school distance-learning classes in Placerville, Calif., after Pacific Gas & Electric shut off power to prevent wildfires amid high winds in September 2020.
Daniel Kim/The Sacramento Bee via AP
School & District Management Vulnerable Students, Districts at Greater Risk as Natural Disasters Grow More Frequent
New federal research indicates the harm from fires and storms to school facilities, learning, and mental health is disproportionate.
Andrew Ujifusa, January 19, 2022
4 min read
Student Achievement Reports High-Achieving, Low-Income Graduates in a Pandemic: Results of a National Survey
The EdWeek Research Center surveyed high-achieving graduates to assess the pandemic’s impact on their lives. This report details findings.
December 29, 2021
Conceptual illustration of young adults in limbo
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College & Workforce Readiness From Our Research Center Class of COVID: 2021's Graduates Are Struggling More and Feeling the Stress
COVID-19 disrupted the class of 2020’s senior year. A year later, the transition to college has in some ways gotten worse.
Alex Harwin & Sarah D. Sparks, October 18, 2021
7 min read
Conceptual Illustration of young person sitting on top of a financial trend line.
Vanessa Solis/Education Week and Klaus Vedfelt/DigitalVision<br/>
College & Workforce Readiness From Our Research Center Helping Students Plan How to Pay for College Is More Important Than Ever: Schools Can Help
Fewer and fewer high school graduates have applied for federal financial aid for college since the pandemic hit.
Sarah D. Sparks, October 18, 2021
4 min read
Logan Balfantz
Logan Balfantz
Courtesy of Sarah Kubinski
College & Workforce Readiness Louisiana Student Finds Stability Amid Tumultuous Freshman Year
Logan Balfantz arrived at the University of Notre Dame last fall considering himself one of the lucky graduates in 2020.
Sarah D. Sparks, October 18, 2021
3 min read
Magdalina Estiverne poses for a portrait at her home in Orlando, Fla., on October 2, 2020. Estiverne graduated from high school in the spring of 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Orlando, Fla., student Magdalena Estiverne poses for a portrait in 2020, four months after her high school graduation.
Eve Edelheit for Education Week
College & Workforce Readiness Layoffs, COVID, Spotty Internet: A Fla. Student Persists in College
Bouts with COVID-19 were just the latest challenges to face class of 2020 graduate Magdalena Estiverne and her family.
Alex Harwin, October 18, 2021
2 min read
Food service assistant Brenda Bartee, rear, gives students breakfast, Tuesday, Aug. 10, 2021, during the first day of school at Washington Elementary School in Riviera Beach, Fla.
Food service assistant Brenda Bartee, rear, gives students breakfast, last month on the first day of school at Washington Elementary School in Riviera Beach, Fla.
Wilfredo Lee/AP
Federal How a Big Federal Spending Package Could Affect School Meals and Student Poverty Counts
Legislation to expand access to free school meals highlights a persistent concern: how to improve the ways we identify students in poverty.
Andrew Ujifusa, September 23, 2021
6 min read
In this Sept. 9, 2020, file photo, Santa Fe Public School food workers Dolores Rodella and Eva Dominguez distribute lunches and breakfasts at a bus stop during the coronavirus pandemic in Santa Fe, New Mexico. New Mexico has recently underwent a pilot program to target aid to the highest-poverty schools in the state.
Santa Fe, N.M., public school food workers Dolores Rodella and Eva Dominguez distribute lunches and breakfasts at a bus stop last September. New Mexico officials recently launched a pilot program to target aid to the highest-poverty schools in the state.
Cedar Attanasio/AP
Education Funding How Many Students Are Living in Poverty? The Number Is Likely Wrong
K-12 policymakers' inability to accurately assess student poverty has resulted in billions of dollars being misspent, a new study says.
Mark Lieberman, June 29, 2021
5 min read
Kejuan Turner, 8, eats a burger from a free bagged lunch provided by the Jefferson County School District on the back of his mother's truck with his brother, Kendrell, 9, outside their home in Fayette, Miss.
Kejuan Turner, 8, eats a burger from a free bagged lunch provided by the Jefferson County school district on the back of his mother's truck with his brother, Kendrell, 9, outside their home in Fayette, Miss., in March.
Leah Willingham/AP
Student Well-Being The Pandemic Brought Universal Free School Meals. Will They Stay?
Relaxed rules during the COVID-19 pandemic have allowed schools to serve universal free meals. Some in Congress want to make that permanent.
Evie Blad, June 1, 2021
8 min read
Silhouette of group of students with data overlay.
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Special Education What the Research Says Gifted Education Comes Up Short for Low-Income and Black Students
Wildly disparate gifted education programs can give a minor boost in reading, but the benefits mainly accrue to wealthy and white students.
Sarah D. Sparks, April 23, 2021
8 min read