School & District Management News in Brief

Bill Likely Brings Feud to a Close in Arizona

By The Associated Press — May 17, 2016 1 min read

The long-standing fight between Arizona’s top elected school official and the state board of education may have come to an end.

Gov. Doug Ducey, a Republican, signed legislation last week that spells out which entity has authority over specific duties.

Schools Superintendent Diane Douglas prompted the fight and a series of ongoing lawsuits early last year when she tried to fire the board’s top staff. Ducey blocked that firing, and the board moved to new offices in a different building. Another clash was over board investigators who look into teacher wrongdoing. Under the compromise measure, the board will retain control over its four employees, and Douglas will assume oversight of the investigators.

A version of this article appeared in the May 18, 2016 edition of Education Week as Bill Likely Brings Feud to a Close in Arizona

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