Equity & Diversity News in Brief

Acting Director Promoted to Lead Federal Office for Indian Education

By Alyson Klein — January 29, 2008 1 min read
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U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings has tapped Cathie Carothers to be the director of the Indian education office within the U.S. Department of Education’s office of elementary and secondary education.

Ms. Carothers, whose appointment took effect Jan. 20, has served as the office’s acting director since October. She has been with the department since 1990.

Her first federal job was teaching students with learning disabilities at a K-8 boarding school in Oklahoma operated by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

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For more stories on this topic see our Federal news page.

A version of this article appeared in the January 30, 2008 edition of Education Week

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