Emergency Preparedness

Children try to protect themselves from the rain at the end of the school day as residents prepare for Hurricane Ida on Aug. 27, 2021, in New Orleans.
Children try to protect themselves from the rain at the end of the school day as residents prepare for Hurricane Ida on Aug. 27, 2021, in New Orleans.
Max Becherer/The Times-Picayune/The New Orleans Advocate via AP
School & District Management Quarter of a Million Students Face New Hurdles in Wake of Hurricane Ida
After months of classroom turmoil sparked by the pandemic, up to 250,000 students now face new struggles triggered by Hurricane Ida.
Will Sentell, The Advocate, Baton Rouge, La., September 1, 2021
2 min read
School Climate & Safety Letter to the Editor We Needed Better Contingency Plans
To the Editor:
After reading the article “Teachers in Limbo as Districts Rush to Boot Up Online Learning” (April 1, 2020), I could not help thinking that our lack of preparedness as educators could have been avoided. In February, the novel coronavirus was looming. We saw how the virus was ravaging through China, Italy, Spain, and elsewhere. Based on expert doctors’ predictions, politicians across America had ample time to strategize.
April 28, 2020
1 min read
BRIC ARCHIVE
UnitoneVector/iStock
School Climate & Safety Opinion A Crisis-Management System for Education Leaders
Mounting an educational response to the coronavirus is a bit like fighting a wildfire, writes the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Justin Reich.
Justin Reich, April 23, 2020
4 min read
BRIC ARCHIVE
Getty/Getty
School Climate & Safety Opinion A Coronavirus Outreach Plan: 5 Steps for District Leaders
When dealing with worried parents, consistent messaging must be an essential part of responding to the threat of COVID-19, writes Katie Test Davis.
Katie Test Davis, March 4, 2020
4 min read
Empty classrooms at the Forest Hills Elementary School in Lake Oswego, Oregon, which remains shuttered through Wednesday March 4, 2020. Oregon Health authorities have identified a school staff member as having a positive COVID-19 Coronavirus test, verified by the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. Lake Oswego School District Superintendent, Dr. Lora de la Cruz stated that the ''deep cleaning'' of the school was being undertaken as a precaution.
Empty classrooms at the Forest Hills Elementary School in Lake Oswego, Oregon, which remains shuttered through Wednesday March 4, 2020. Oregon Health authorities have identified a school staff member as having a positive COVID-19 Coronavirus test, verified by the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. Lake Oswego School District Superintendent, Dr. Lora de la Cruz stated that the ''deep cleaning'' of the school was being undertaken as a precaution.
© Ken Hawkins/ZUMA Wire
School & District Management Closing Schools Saved Lives During the Spanish Flu. Can It Work for Coronavirus?
Closing schools blunted the impact of the Spanish Flu in 1918. But in 2020, shuttering schools for a prolonged period would bring big costs.
Jake Maher, March 4, 2020
4 min read
BRIC ARCHIVE
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Teaching How Teachers Are Talking to Students About the Coronavirus
As the coronavirus spreads, teachers are put in the hard spot of educating students about prevention without scaring them.
Sarah Schwartz, March 3, 2020
6 min read
A teacher at Taipei American School teaches an English lesson to his students via a remote learning program while schools were closed in Taiwan to help prevent the spread of coronavirus. Schools in other countries, including China and Japan, are also closed.
A teacher at Taipei American School teaches an English lesson to his students via a remote learning program while schools were closed in Taiwan to help prevent the spread of coronavirus. Schools in other countries, including China and Japan, are also closed.
Walid Berrazeg /SOPA Images
Classroom Technology Coronavirus Prompting E-Learning Strategies
Schools and tech companies in the U.S. and abroad have experience deploying virtual learning should a coronavirus emergency arise.
Mark Lieberman, March 3, 2020
5 min read
School & District Management How to Respond to Coronavirus: 6 Steps for Schools
Here are key steps for district and school leaders to follow if coronavirus hits your community.
Mark Lieberman, March 2, 2020
4 min read
A man wears a mask over his mouth as a precaution against the spread of the new coronavirus COVID-19 in Mexico City. Mexico’s assistant health secretary announced Friday that the country now has confirmed cases of the new coronavirus.
A man wears a mask over his mouth as a precaution against the spread of the new coronavirus COVID-19 in Mexico City. Mexico’s assistant health secretary announced Friday that the country now has confirmed cases of the new coronavirus.
AP Photo/Fernando Llano
School & District Management 9 Things Educators Need to Know About Coronavirus
Coronavirus cases have now directly hit U.S. schools. Here’s what school leaders need to know right now about the virus.
Mark Lieberman, February 28, 2020
7 min read
Dr. Robert Redfield, Director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, testifies at a House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing on the status of the U.S. and international response to the global Coronavirus outbreak on Feb. 27, 2020, in Washington, D.C.
Dr. Robert Redfield, Director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, testifies at a House Foreign Affairs Committee hearing on the status of the U.S. and international response to the global Coronavirus outbreak on Feb. 27, 2020, in Washington, D.C.
Graeme Sloan/Education Week
School & District Management Coronavirus and School Closures: What Are the Legal, Logistical Issues?
Experts say states have authority to shut schools down if needed, but in the words of one, it’s “not like turning a light switch on or off.”
Mark Walsh, February 28, 2020
6 min read
The EDGE computer simulation was developed by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the U.S. Army to allow educators and first responders to practice their responses to emergencies, like school shootings.
The EDGE computer simulation was developed by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the U.S. Army to allow educators and first responders to practice their responses to emergencies, like school shootings.
Photo via U.S. Department of Homeland Security
School Climate & Safety Barricade or Flee? Simulator Trains Educators and Police for School Shootings
The computer simulation—which looks similar to a video game—allows teachers, administrators, and police to train for crisis events in schools, including shootings. The Department of Homeland Security will offer the program free to schools starting Nov. 1.
Evie Blad, September 25, 2018
10 min read
George Roberts was the principal at Perry Hall High School in 2012 when a student shot Daniel Borowy, a student with Down Syndrome, in the cafeteria on the first day of school. Borowy survived and returned to add his handprint to the Baltimore LOVE Project mural painted in the cafeteria. Each handprint on the mural is from every student who was in the cafeteria at the time of the shooting. Borowy’s is the single white handprint on the “O.” The mural was finished December 13, 2012, one day before the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre.
George Roberts was the principal at Perry Hall High School in 2012 when a student shot Daniel Borowy, a student with Down Syndrome, in the cafeteria on the first day of school. Borowy survived and returned to add his handprint to the Baltimore LOVE Project mural painted in the cafeteria. Each handprint on the mural is from every student who was in the cafeteria at the time of the shooting. Borowy’s is the single white handprint on the “O.” The mural was finished December 13, 2012, one day before the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre.
Matt Roth for Education Week
School Climate & Safety 'You Have to Redefine Normal': Leading Schools in the Aftermath of a Shooting
In the unfortunate club of principals and K-12 administrators whose schools become the site of unthinkable violence, the best source of guidance to navigate the grief, trauma, and leadership challenges that follow are their peers who've been through it.
Denisa R. Superville, March 21, 2018
10 min read
Ryan Petty, left, of Parkland, Fla., whose 14-year-old daughter, Alaina, was killed in the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, hugs Katherine Posada, a teacher at the school, after they testified at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing.
Ryan Petty, left, of Parkland, Fla., whose 14-year-old daughter, Alaina, was killed in the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, hugs Katherine Posada, a teacher at the school, after they testified at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing.
Jacquelyn Martin/AP
School Climate & Safety Federal Response to Fla. Shooting Starts to Take Shape
Legislation on school safety is bubbling in the Republican-controlled Congress, though new gun restrictions don't appear to be in the cards.
Andrew Ujifusa, March 20, 2018
5 min read
BRIC ARCHIVE
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School Climate & Safety Opinion The Case for Limiting School Security
Increasing school security doesn’t decrease school violence, but programs that promote a culture of empathy could, says author and professor Jennifer Young
Jennifer Young, March 19, 2018
4 min read