Opinion
Education Opinion

A Multiage Challenge

By Amy Abeln — July 31, 2007 2 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

After returning from a week long vacation, I am back at Camp El Valor for the second four-week session and I must admit, I am very excited! We have the same curriculum, but new faces and new challenges. The first difference I’ve noticed is the wider range of ages. Last session saw mostly fifth and sixth graders. This session has quite a different split: several incoming fourth graders, as well as several incoming freshman with a strong showing of all ages in between.

I find teaching in multiage classrooms incredibly exciting and rewarding. My first job teaching was in a Montessori classroom of 12-14-year-olds. I then moved into a 9-12-year-old classroom. Montessori splits by age, not grade, and I find this creates a motivating, dynamic environment.

At camp, days 1 and 2 always include several introductory activities. While many children are learning keyboarding posture and technique, more advanced typists are transcribing hand-written journals about their science experiences into Microsoft Word documents. While some work on creating interviews in a question and answer style, others work on turning their questions and answers into paragraphs about the person they interviewed.

Already I’ve seen the younger children observing the older children, witnessing the “next level” as the older students discuss their work. Some of the nine and ten year-olds asked if they could write in paragraphs, too. “Of course!” I answered, excited to see their desire for a challenge. And the older children seem more ready to set a positive example. Students learn better when they have peer role models they can rely on for help, and when they practice their skills by teaching others.

The typical expectation of a single-grade classroom, that children possess similar knowledge and skills, creates pressure on both children and the teachers. There is a tendency in a homogeneous age group to judge the children who fail to meet benchmarks as “below average.” Yet there is no evidence that supports the idea that groups of children who are all the same age learn the same things in the same way at the same time.

Conversely, in a multiage classroom, the difference in ages begets different sets of behavior and performance expectations. In this environment, the teacher more readily addresses differences because differences are more obvious. It is also easier for a child to address his or her strengths and weaknesses without feeling judged by his or her peers. Students can progress along a continuum of simple to more complex skills at their own pace.

Dr. Maria Montessori developed educational methods based on her belief that children learn best by doing, not by being acquiescent vessels to be filled with pre-existing knowledge. Montessori believed learning should occur in multiage classrooms where children at various stages of development learn with and from one another. Though it’s been several years since I’ve been in a Montessori classroom, I see her idea of multiage learning once again as fresh and innovative, offering possible solutions to many of the problems that plague public school teachers. I’m finding my multiage experience to be reinvigorating both for me, and for the children in this camp.

The opinions expressed in My Summer at Tech Camp are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

Events

Special Education Webinar Reading, Dyslexia, and Equity: Best Practices for Addressing a Threefold Challenge
Learn about proven strategies for instruction and intervention that support students with dyslexia.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Leading Systemic Redesign: Strategies from the Field
Learn how your school community can work together to redesign the school system, reengineer instruction, & co-author personalized learning.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Personalized Learning Webinar
No Time to Waste: Individualized Instruction Will Drive Change
Targeted support and intervention can boost student achievement. Join us to explore tutoring’s role in accelerating the turnaround. 
Content provided by Varsity Tutors for Schools

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Briefly Stated: November 23, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated: November 2, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated: October 19, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated: October 12, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read