Education

News in Brief: A Washington Roundup

February 11, 2004 2 min read
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Grant Program Unveiled For Researcher Training

The Department of Education announced last week that it would provide up to $50 million in grants over five years to train a new generation of researchers capable of producing scientifically rigorous studies in education.

Information on the federal grant programs is available at www.ed.gov/programs /edresearch/applicant.html.

The first-time grants, which would go to colleges and universities, are part of the department’s ongoing efforts to transform education into an “evidence- based field.” Department officials contend that education schools are producing too few education researchers with the know-how to conduct the kind of “scientifically based research” that is being called for in the No Child Left Behind Act.

“Solid research will help teachers in the classroom reach their students and in turn help students achieve better results,” Secretary of Education Rod Paige said in a press release.

To be administered through the department’s Institute of Education Sciences, the grants would support the creation of interdisciplinary doctoral programs for education researchers. That means university departments in psychology, anthropology, economics, sociology, and other subjects—as well as education schools and departments— could qualify for the grants of up to $1 million a year over five years. The agency hopes to award up to 10 such grants.

—Debra Viadero

New Drug-Free Schools, Technology Officials Named

Secretary of Education Rod Paige has named Deborah A. Price as his deputy undersecretary in charge of the office of safe and drug-free schools. She will oversee the Department of Education’s planning in areas such as drug- abuse prevention, student well-being, and citizenship, as well as coordinating its homeland-security efforts, the department said in announcing her appointment on Feb. 2.

Ms. Price previously served as the chief of staff in the department’s office of federal student aid. Before joining the Bush administration, she worked as a policy adviser to Sen. Don Nickles, R-Okla. She replaces Eric G. Andell, who resigned in October.

Meanwhile, Susan D. Patrick has been named the acting director of the office of educational technology within the department. In that role she will oversee the department’s efforts to coordinate virtual education, e-learning, and long- term planning in school technology.

She replaces John P. Bailey, who resigned on Jan. 30, department spokesman David Thomas said.

—Sean Cavanagh

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