Education

Grants

March 17, 2004 11 min read
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GRANTS AWARDED

FROM PRIVATE SOURCES

Benton Foundation Grant

The Benton Foundation, a private foundation based in Washington that supports diversity, communication, cultural expression and technology education, recently awarded the Education Development Center, a nonprofit education and health organization, a three-year $668,000 grant. The grant will be used to establish a center for media and community that will examine and find solutions for social problems and improve education through technology and communication.

Mitsubishi Foundation Grant

The Mitsubishi Electric America Foundation, the philanthropic-arm of Mitsubishi Electric Corporation of Japan, recently awarded 14 organizations $919,000 in grants to help improve the education of students with disabilities.
The grants provide teacher training, technical assistance, and teaching resources.
The winners are listed below.
Boys and Girls Clubs of America, Atlanta; National 4-H Council, Chevy Chase, Md; National Wildlife Federation, Reston, Va; Half the Planet Foundation, Washington; Chabot Space and Science Center, Oakland, Calif; Manhattan New Music Project, New York City; WETA, Washington; Recording for the Blind and Dyslexic, Princeton, N.J.; Girl Scout Council of Orange County, Costa Mesa, Calif; Computer Technologies Program, Berkeley, Calif; Partners for Youth with Disabilities, Boston; Tech Mentoring Coast to Coast Collaborative; American Association of People with Disabilities, Washington; and Project SEARCH, Cincinnati.

FROM CORPORATE SOURCES

SBC Foundation Grant

The SBC Foundation, the philanthropic arm of SBC Communications, Inc., a data, voice, and Internet service provider, recently awarded a $5 million grant to the National Council for Community and Education Partnerships. The grant will support teacher training in technology, technology-based afterschool programs, and create partnerships in 13 states for low-income students to help prepare them for college through the Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs project.

Sodexho Foundation Grant

The Sodexho Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Sodexho USA, a food and facilities management company based in Gaithersburg, Md., has awarded a three- year $300,000 grant to Jumpstart, a service organization based in Boston that trains college students to work in early childhood programs in low- income communities. The grant will support literacy for preschool children in poor communities and encourage college students to seek a career in teaching.

GRANTS AVAILABLE

FROM CORPORATE SOURCES

Applications are due April 1 for youth leadership grants from the Starbucks Foundation. Grants support youth literacy and diversity programs for children and adolescents ages 6-18. Programs that support underserved communities are eligible to apply.
Contact: SF, 2401 Utah Ave. S., S-SR-1, Suite 800, Seattle, WA 98134; (206) 318-7022.

Applications are due April 9 for teacher grants from Digi- Block, Inc. Grants support professional development and curricular assessments using the Digi-Block Learning System. Teachers and teacher groups interested in using the system in their classrooms are eligible to apply for up to $5,000 in funding.
Contact: Zoe O. van der Meulen, DB, 125 Walnut St., Watertown, MA 02472; (617) 926-9300; fax: (617) 926-9555; e-mail: grants@digi-block.com; Web site: www.digi- block.com/grant/index.cfm.

Applications are due any time for grants from the Hasbro Children’s Foundation. Grants of up to $35,000 are available for programs that address the emotional and physical health of disadvantaged children. Nonprofit, educational organizations are eligible to apply.
Contact: HCF, 10 Rockefeller Plaza, 16th Floor, New York, NY 10020; (212) 713- 7654; Web site: www.hasbro.org.

Applications are due any time for education grants from the Allstate Foundation. Grants support school programs that focus on student safety and development, mentoring, conflict resolution, driver’s education, and drunk driving prevention. K-12 public schools and nonprofit organizations are eligible to apply. Grants ranging from $5,000 to $10,000 are available.
Contact: AF, 2775 Sanders Road, Suite F3, Northbrook, IL 60063-6127; (847) 402- 5502; e-mail: allfound@allstate.com; Web site: www.allstate.com/community.

A pplications are due any time for grants from the Goldman Sachs Foundation. Grants support programs that seek to improve academic achievement, business education, and educational partnerships at public and private schools.
Contact: GSF, 375 Park Avenue, Suite 1008,New York, NY 10152; (212) 888-9482; fax: (212) 902-3925; Web site: www.gs.com/our_firm/the_culture/social_responsibility/gs_foundation.htm l.

FROM PRIVATE SOURCES

Applications are due March 21 for geographic literacy grants from the National Council for the Social Studies. Grants support the enhancement of geographic literacy in K-12 schools. K-12 educators and university professors are eligible to apply. A one- year grant of $2,500 is available.
Contact: Ana C. Post, NCSS, 8555 16th St., Suite 500, Silver Spring, MD 20910; (301) 588-1800 ext. 106; e-mail: infoserv@ncss.org; Web site: www.socialstu dies.org/awards/grants.shtml#geography.

Applications are due April 30 for CiviConnections grants from the National Council for the Social Studies. Grants support programs that engage students in the community through service learning and help them understand local and national history. Teacher teams - composed of three 3-12 educators - in the United States are eligible to apply. Thirty-three grants of $7,500 are available.
Contact: NCSS, 8555 16th St., Suite 500, Silver Spring, MD 20910; (301) 588- 1800 ext. 106; e-mail: infoserv@ncss.org; Web site: http://www.ncss.org/civiconnections/home.shtml.

Applications are due any time for Advancing Student Achievement grants from the Actuarial Foundation, Schaumburg, Ill-based nonprofit that represents the actuarial profession. Grants provide support for mathematics students by pairing teachers and volunteer actuaries in the classroom. Volunteer actuaries help cover math topics such as budgeting, investment, and statistics.
K-12 schools in the United States and Canada interested in developing math mentoring programs that involves actuaries as volunteers are eligible to apply. Grants of up to $25,000 are available.
Contact: AF, 475 N. Martingale Road, Suite 600, Schaumburg, IL 60173-2226; (847) 706-3535: fax: (847) 706-3599; Web site: www.actuarialfoundation.org.

Applications are due any time for Teaching Tolerance grants from the Southern Poverty Law Center. Grants supports sustained programs that educate students and staff about tolerance and peacemaking. Grants of up to $2,000 are available. K-12 classroom teachers are eligible to apply.
Contact: TTG, 400 Washington Ave., Montgomery, AL 36104; Web site: www.tolerance.org.

Applications are due any time for music grants from Mr. Holland’s Opus Foundation. The foundation supports two types of programs. The Melody Program purchases and pays for the repair of musical instruments in existing K-12 school music programs. The Special Projects Program provides instruments and repairs to community schools and after school programs. Non-cash grants ranging from $500 to $5,000 are available. K-12 public and community schools with programs that are at least three years old are eligible to apply.
Contact: MHOF, 15125 Ventura Boulevard, Suite 204, Sherman Oaks, CA 91403; (818) 784-6787; fax: (818) 784-6788; e-mail: info@mhopus.org; Web site: www.mhopus.org.

FROM FEDERAL SOURCES

Applications are due March 19 for elementary and secondary school counseling grants from the U.S. Department of Education’s office of safe and drug-free schools. Grants support the expansion or establishment of school-based counseling programs. Local educational agencies are eligible to apply. Thirty-five three-year awards ranging from $250,000 to $400,000 are available.
Contact: Loretta McDaniel, USDE, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Room 3E220, Washington, DC 20202-6450; (202) 260-2661; e-mail: loretta.mcdaniel@ed.gov.

Applications are due March 22 for Carol M. White physical education program grants from the U.S Department of Education’s office of safe and drug- free schools. Grants support the establishment, expansion, or improvement of school-based and after-school K-12 physical education programs. Two hundred and thirty three-year grants ranging from $100,000 to $500,000 are available. Local educational agencies and after-school programs, including faith-based organizations, are eligible to apply.
Contact: Ann Weinheimer or Pat Rattler, USDE, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W, Room 3E- 330, Washington, DC 20202-6450; (202) 260-5939; e-mail: Ann.Weinheimer@ed.gov or Pat.Rattler@ed.gov.

Applications are due April 2 for the William F. Gooding Even Start Family Literacy Program grants from the U.S Department of Education’s office of elementary and secondary education. Grants support educational programs that assist low- income families by promoting academic achievement, literacy, and early childhood education. Federally recognized Indian tribes and tribal organizations are eligible to apply. Up to 29 two-year grants ranging from $150,000 to $250,000 are available.
Contact: Doris Sligh, USDE, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Room 3W246, Washington, DC 20202-6132; (202) 260-0999; e-mail: Doris.Sligh@ed.gov.

Applications are due April 2 for teacher quality enhancement grants from the U.S. Department of Education’s office of postsecondary education. Grants support the improvement of teacher education programs. K-12 schools, universities, and high-need local educational agencies that work in partnerships are eligible to apply. Twenty-five five-year grants averaging $1.1 million per year are available.
Contact: Luretha Kelley, USDE, 1990 K St., N.W., Room 7096, Washington, DC 20006; (202) 502-7645; e-mail: Luretha.Kelley@ed.gov.

Applications are due April 2 for demonstration grants for Indian children from the U.S. Department of Education’s office of Indian education. Grants support programs that develop and implement effective educational services and academic achievement for preschool, elementary, and secondary Indian students. State and local educational agencies, Indian organizations, tribes, and federally supported schools are eligible to apply. Fourteen three- year grants ranging from $150,000 to $400,000 are available.
Contact: Victoria Vasques, USDE, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Room 3W205, Washington, DC 20202; (202) 260-3774; e-mail: oiegrant@ed.gov.

Applications are due April 5 for college assistance migrant program grants from the U.S. Department of Education’s office of elementary and secondary education. Grants support financial and academic aide for college students from migrant families. Universities and colleges are eligible to apply. Fourteen five-year grants ranging from $150,000 to $425,000 are available.
Contact: Mary L. Suazo, USDE, Office of Migrant Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Room 3E227, Washington, DC 20202-6135; (202) 260-1396; e-mail: mary.suazo@ed.gov.

Applications are due April 5 for high school equivalency program grants from the U.S Department of Education’s office of elementary and secondary education. Grants support GED programs that help migrant workers and their children obtain a high school education. Colleges, universities, and private nonprofit organizations are eligible to apply. Fifteen five-year grants ranging from $150,000 to $475,000 are available.
Contact: Mary L. Suazo, USDE, 400 Maryland Ave., S,W., Room 3E227, Washington, DC 20202-6135; (202) 260-1396; e-mail: mary.suazo@ed.gov.

Applications are due April 5 for professional development grants from the U.S. Department of Education’s office of Indian education. Grants support programs that provide teacher training, teacher education services, and workshops that assist Indian individuals in advancing or becoming teachers. Universities, Indian institutions, state and local education agencies, and Indian tribes are eligible to apply. Sixteen three-year grants averaging $400,000 are available.
Contact: Victoria Vasques, USDE, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Room 3W205, Washington, DC 20202; (202) 260-3774; e-mail: oiegrant@ed.gov.

Applications are due April 5 for enhanced assessment instrument grants from the U.S. Department of Education’s office of elementary and secondary and education. Grants support projects to improve student assessment systems. State educational agencies are eligible to apply. Six grants ranging from $100,000 to $2 million are available.
Contact: Sue Rigney, USDE, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Room 3C139, Washington, DC 20202; (202) 260-0931; e-mail: Sue.Rigney@ed.gov.

Applications are due April 9 for partnerships in character education grants from the U.S. Department of Education’s office of safe and drug free schools. Grants support the design and implementation of character education programs for K-12 students. State and local educational agencies working in partnership with a university or nonprofit organization are eligible to apply. Up to nine two- year grants averaging $300,000 to $500,000 are available.
Contact: Sharon J. Burton, USDE, 555 New Jersey Avenue, N.W., Room 203, Washington, DC 20208; (202) 219-2044; fax: (202) 208-1190; e-mail: Sharon.Burton@ed.gov.

Applications are due April 9 for grants to reduce alcohol abuse from the U.S. Department of Education’s office of safe and drug free schools. Grants support programs that effectively reduce alcohol abuse in high schools. Local educational agencies are eligible to apply. Eleven three-year grants averaging $500,000 are available.
Contact: Ethel F. Jackson, USDE, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Room 3E308, Washington, DC 20202; (202) 260-2812; e-mail: ethel.jackson@ed.gov.


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