Education

Deadlines

April 28, 2004 9 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print
Student Scholarships, Contests, and Awards

TEACHER FELLOWSHIPS, CONTESTS, AND AWARDS

May 1—Administrators: Applications are due for the Pinnacle Awards, sponsored by the Association of School Business Officials International. The awards recognize school business officials who improve school management through tactics such as good budgeting, construction, energy conservation, safety, and technology. K-12 school superintendents, business managers, school board finance secretaries, and transportation, food service, accounting, facilities, and information systems managers are eligible to apply. Nominees must be ASBO International members. Three people will receive Pinnacle of Achievement Awards and $1,000 cash prizes. One award winner will receive the Pinnacle of Excellence Award, a $5,000 cash prize, $5,000 worth of school furniture, and an all-expense paid trip to the ASBO International Conference in Cincinnati, The awards ceremony will be held Oct. 18, 2004 at the conference.

Contact: Pam Weber, ASBO International, 11401 North Shore Drive, Reston, VA 20190-4232; (703) 478-0405; Web site: www.asbointl.org.

May 1—Social studies: Applications are due for the Christa McAuliffe Reach for the Stars Award, sponsored by the National Council for the Social Studies and the Fund for the Advancement of Social Studies Education. Awards support the development and enhancement of quality curricular strategies, citizenship projects, and field experiences. Full-time K-12 social studies teachers are eligible to apply. Each recipient will receive a one-year, $1,000 grant, and will run a presentation session at the NCSS national conference.

Contact: Ana C. Post, NCSS, 8555 16th St., Suite 500, Silver Spring, MD, 20910; e-mail: information@ncss.org; Web site: www.socialstudies.org/awards/grants.shtml#stars.

May 3—Science: Applications are due for the 2004 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching from the National Science Foundation. The awards honor K-6 math and science teachers who show excellent teaching methods. Up to 108 national winners will each receive a $10,000 award and an all-expenses paid trip for two to Washington, where they will be honored by the President.

Contact: NSF, 4201 Wilson Blvd., Arlington, VA 22230; (800) 628-8442; Web site: www.nsf.gov/pa.

May 7—Substitute teachers: Applications are due for calls for conference proposals for Utah State University’s Substitute Teaching Institute. K-12 researchers—and organizations with presentations on recruiting, training, or retaining substitute teachers—are eligible to apply. Presenters will receive $50 off the conference registration fee and a certificate of appreciation.

Contact: Andrae Ferguson, STI, USU, 6516 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322; (800) 922- 4693; fax: (435) 797-0944; e-mail: andrae@subed.usu.edu; Web site: http://subed.usu.edu/subsolutions.

May 10—Distance education: Applications are due for the 2004 Distance Learning Awards, sponsored by the U.S Distance Learning Association. The awards honor distance learning educators, organizations, companies and schools for excellence in distance learning teaching, programming and individual achievements. Awards will be presented in five categories: Pre-K-12, corporate/business, government, higher education, and telehealth. Winners will be honored at the USDLA Conference on Oct. 12, 2004 in San Francisco.

Contact: USDLA 2004 Awards Committee, c/o Julie E. Young, Florida Virtual School, 445 West Amelia St., Suite 301, Orlando, FL 32801; (800) 275- 5162; e-mail: 2004USDLAAwardsInfo@usdla.org; Web site: www.usdla.org.

May 14—Education reform: Applications are due for the 2005 Thomas B. Fordham Prize for distinguished scholarship and the Thomas B. Fordham Prize for valor. The distinguished scholarship award honors education scholars and researchers who have had a significant impact on education reform. The valor award recognizes the accomplishments of national, state, and local school officials. Individuals who have influenced or generated important changes in education are eligible to apply.

Contact: Kathleen Porter. TBFF, 1627 K St., N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20006; Web site: http://www.edexcellence.net/foundation/global/page.cfm?id=42.

May 15—Technology: Applications are due for the Win a Wireless Lab sweepstakes, sponsored by the Discovery Channel School and CDW-G, a technology provider based in Vernon Hills, Ill. Employees at K-12 schools in the United States are eligible to enter. The grand prize winner will receive a wireless, mobile IBM lab with 20 computers, NETGEAR wireless products, and on-site set- up and training. Four runners-up will receive alternative prizes, including HP projectors, Inkjet printers, networking products, and curricular materials.

Contact: Barbara Crystal, CDW-G, 230 N. Milwaukee Ave., Vernon Hills, IL 60061 or Discovery Communications, Inc., One Discovery Place, Silver Spring, MD 20910; Web site: www.discoveryschool.com/cdwg.

May 21—International education: Applications are due for the 2004 Goldman Sachs Foundation Prizes for Excellence in International Education from the Goldman Sachs Foundation and the Asia Society. The awards recognize five organizations that encourage global education in the following categories: elementary/middle school, high school, higher education, state, and media/technology. Award recipients will each receive a $25,000 prize and be given the opportunity to work with the Asia Society’s network of international schools.

Contact: Asia Society, 725 Park Ave., New York, NY 10021; (212) 327- 9285; e-mail: gsfprizes@asiasoc.org; Web site: http://www.internationaled.org/prizes.

May 28—Space education: Applications are due for the Christa McAuliffe Memorial Award, sponsored by the Aerospace Education Foundation. The award honors one public, private, or parochial K-12 classroom teacher who successfully teaches students about aerospace technologies. The winner will receive a $1,000 stipend and a trip to Washington to attend the award ceremony.

Contact: Jancy Bell, AEF, 1501 Lee Hwy., Arlington, VA 22209; (800) 291- 8480; fax: (703) 247-5853; e-mail: AEFstaff@aef.org; Web site: www.aef.org.

June 1—Technology: Applications are due for the Innovative Use of Franklin Learning Devices in the Classroom Awards, sponsored by Franklin Electronic Publishers. The awards honor educators who find unique ways to use electronic learning aids in classrooms. Winners will receive learning devices for their classroom.

Contact: Amy Li, Franklin Learning Resources, One Franklin Plaza, Burlington, NJ 08016-4907; (609) 386-2500; fax: (609) 387-1787; e-mail: Amy_Li@franklin.com; Web site: www.franklin.com.

June 30— Facilities: Applications are due for the Alliance to Save Energy’s Earth Apple Awards. The awards honor K-12 schools that teach students to conserve energy in their school buildings. To be eligible, a school must submit records that show activities in which students have helped conserve energy within their school facility during the school year. Every school that enters will win a prize. Grand prize winners will receive laptops, tool kits, digital cameras, and camcorders.

Contact: Kerry Quinn, ASE, 1200 18th St. NW, Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036; (202) 857-0666; e-mail: kquinn@ase.org; Web site: http://www.ase.org/greenschools/eaawardsus2004.pdf

STUDENT SCHOLARSHIPS, CONTESTS, AND AWARDS

May 3—Scholarships: Applications are due for scholarships from the American Indian Education Foundation. High school seniors of American Indian decent planning to attend a two-year or four-year university are eligible to apply. Scholarships of up to $3,000 are available.

Contact: Susan Gibson, AIEF,10029 SW Nimbus Ave., Suite 200, Beaverton, OR 97008; (866) 866-8642; fax: (503) 641-0495; Web site: www.aiefprograms.org.

May 14— Environmental education: Applications are due for the Rice Farming: Earth’s Friend contest, sponsored by the U.S. Rice Producers Association. The contest asks students in grades 4-12 to write a 500- to 800- word essay describing the benefits of rice farming and its impact on the environment and native wildlife. The contest is open to students in rice-growing states, including Arkansas, California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, and Texas. One student from each grade will receive a $150 cash award.

Contact: USRPA, 2900 Wilcrest, Suite 180, Houston, TX 77042; e-mail: riceessay@aol.com; Web site: www.riceromp.com/contest.

May 15—Scholarships: Applications are due for the 9-11 Education Fund college scholarships from the Sallie Mae Fund. High school students who are the children of victims of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, and have been accepted to a Title IV eligible two-year or four-year vocational or technical school, or university, are eligible to apply. Scholarships of $2,500 are available.

Contact: SMF, c/o Community Foundation for the National Capital Region, 1201 15th St., N.W., Suite 420, Washington, DC 20005; Web site: www.thesalliemaefund.org.

May 31—Scholarships: Applications are due for scholarships from the Dore Achievement Centers, a Louisville, Ky.-based program that provides exercise- based treatment options for children and adults with learning disorders. Scholarships of $500 are available for students. To be eligible, five parents must partner with a public or private school, enroll in a Dore Achievement Centers program, and provide their students’ standardized test results.

Contact: DAC; (866) 784-4377; Web site: www.dorecenters.com.

May 31— Scholarships: Applications are due for Unmet Need Fund college scholarships from the Sallie Mae Fund. The scholarships are designed to help students who receive college financial assistance packages that are at least $1,000 less than what they need. High school students meeting the above criteria who have been accepted at a Title IV eligible two-year or four-year vocational or technical school, or university are eligible to apply. Scholarships range from $1,000 to $3,800.

Contact: SMF, Scholarship Management Services, Scholarship America, One Scholarship Way, P.O. Box 297, Saint Peter, MN 56082; (507) 931-1682; Web site: www.thesalliemaefund.org.

May 31—Writing: Applications are due for the My Teacher is the Best essay contest, sponsored by the Public Education Network. For the contest, middle school students are asked to write a 250-word essay about their favorite teacher, what they think makes a good teacher, and why. The first prize winner will receive two laptop computers—one for the essay writer and one for his or her teacher.

Contact: GiveKidsGoodSchools.com, Eve Fox, 2120 L St. N.W, Suite 400, Washington, DC 20037; (202) 223-9547; Web site: www.givekidsgoodschools.com/goodteachers/essay.html.

June 20— Writing: Applications are due for the 2004 Youth Honor Award Program from Skipping Stones Magazine, a multicultural publication based in Eugene, Ore. Students ages seven to 17 will be asked to write essays, poems, and plays, and submit photographic or painted art that encourages multicultural and environmental awareness. Ten award winners will each receive a subscription to the magazine and five books about the environment.

Contact: SS, PO Box 3939, Eugene, OR 97403; (541) 342-4956; Web site: www.skippingstones.org.

June 30— Scholarships: Applications are due for college scholarships from the Sallie Mae Fund. The scholarships are designed to assist students with family incomes of $35,000 or less. High school students meeting the above criteria who have been accepted to a Title IV eligible two-year or four-year vocational or technical school, or university are eligible to apply. Scholarships range from $500 to $2,000.

Contact: SMF, Scholarship Management Services, Scholarship America, One Scholarship Way, P.O. Box 297, Saint Peter, MN 56082; (507) 931-1682; Web site: www.thesalliemaefund.org.

Events

Classroom Technology Webinar How Pandemic Tech Is (and Is Not) Transforming K-12 Schools
The COVID-19 pandemic—and the resulting rise in virtual learning and big investments in digital learning tools— helped educators propel their technology skills to the next level. Teachers have become more adept at using learning management
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Data Webinar
Using Integrated Analytics To Uncover Student Needs
Overwhelmed by data? Learn how an integrated approach to data analytics can help.

Content provided by Instructure
School & District Management Live Online Discussion Principal Overload: How to Manage Anxiety, Stress, and Tough Decisions
According to recent surveys, more than 40 percent of principals are considering leaving their jobs. With the pandemic, running a school building has become even more complicated, and principals' workloads continue to grow. f we

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Gunman in 2018 Parkland School Massacre Pleads Guilty
A jury will decide whether Nikolas Cruz will be executed for one of the nation’s deadliest school shootings.
3 min read
Annika Dworet and her husband, Mitch Dworet, wipe away tears as their son's name is read aloud during Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooter Nikolas Cruz's guilty plea on all 17 counts of premeditated murder and 17 counts of attempted murder in the 2018 shootings, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. on Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021. The Dworet's son, Nicholas Dworet, 17, was killed in the massacre.
Annika Dworet and her husband, Mitch Dworet, wipe away tears as their son's name is read aloud during Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooter Nikolas Cruz's guilty plea on all 17 counts of premeditated murder and 17 counts of attempted murder in the 2018 shootings, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. on Wednesday, Oct. 20, 2021. The Dworet's son, Nicholas Dworet, 17, was killed in the massacre.
Amy Beth Bennett/South Florida Sun Sentinel via AP
Education Briefly Stated: October 20, 2021
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Gunman in Parkland School Massacre to Plead Guilty
The gunman who killed 14 students and three staff members at a Florida high school will plead guilty to their murders, his attorneys said.
4 min read
Parkland school shooter Nikolas Cruz is sworn in before pleading guilty, Friday, Oct. 15, 2021, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on all four criminal counts stemming from his attack on a Broward County jail guard in November 2018, Cruz's lawyers said Friday that he plans to plead guilty to the 2018 massacre at a Parkland high school.
Parkland school shooter Nikolas Cruz is sworn in before pleading guilty, Friday, Oct. 15, 2021, at the Broward County Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., on all four criminal counts stemming from his attack on a Broward County jail guard in November 2018, Cruz's lawyers said Friday that he plans to plead guilty to the 2018 massacre at a Parkland high school.
Amy Beth Bennett/South Florida Sun Sentinel via AP
Education California Makes Ethnic Studies a High School Requirement
California is among the first in the nation to require students to take a course in ethnic studies to get a diploma starting in 2029-30.
4 min read
FILE - In this Jan. 22, 2020, file photo, Democratic Assembly members, from left, James Ramos, Chris Holden Jose Medina, and Rudy Salas, Jr., right, huddle during an Assembly session in Sacramento, Calif. Medina's bill to make ethnic studies a high school requirement was signed into law by California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday, Oct. 8, 2021. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)