Education

Cuts Will Do Long-Term Damage, Former Secretary Hufstedler Says

By Eileen White — May 05, 1982 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Former U.S. Secretary of Education Shirley M. Hufstedler warned last week that “the budget struggles on the Potomac right now will have very serious consequences for every aspect of the American educational systems not only in this decade, but well into the next century.”

“To give $1.6 trillion to the military, appropriations for the federal education programs are being systematically stripped,” Ms. Hufstedler said in an address at Stanford University, where she is a visiting professor of law. “Savage cuts were taken last year in programs designed to help school districts meet the needs of the most disadvantaged youngsters in the country.”

“The most acute military need is not hardware, it is human resources,” she said.

Ms. Hufstedler, who was the first secretary appointed to the Cabinet-level department established during the Carter Administration, claimed that the Reagan Administration is “abandoning” minority children--who, she said, will make up 75 percent of “all the children who will reach age 18 by 1999.”

“These are the same children who must overwhelmingly provide the personnel for the armed forces, the labor force whose work must support an aging America.” The budget cuts in education programs will result in “unemployment, welfare dependency, and crime,” she said.

Ms. Hufstedler also suggested it was unwise to cut funding for American education at the same time that “the investment in education” in the U.S.S.R. is increasing. “We have an acute shortage of secondary-school teachers qualified to teach mathematics, science, computer technology, and languages,” she said. “About 100,000 students in the secondary schools in the United States now receive calculus in high school. All students attending high school in the U.S.S.R. now receive three full years of mathematics before graduation.”

She urged the audience not to wring their hands, but to “ring doorbells” to urge a reversal of the Administration’s reductions in education programs.

Related Tags:

Events

Special Education Webinar Reading, Dyslexia, and Equity: Best Practices for Addressing a Threefold Challenge
Learn about proven strategies for instruction and intervention that support students with dyslexia.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Personalized Learning Webinar
No Time to Waste: Individualized Instruction Will Drive Change
Targeted support and intervention can boost student achievement. Join us to explore tutoring’s role in accelerating the turnaround. 
Content provided by Varsity Tutors for Schools
Student Well-Being K-12 Essentials Forum Social-Emotional Learning: Making It Meaningful
Join us for this event with educators and experts on the damage the pandemic did to academic and social and emotional well-being.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Briefly Stated: November 23, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated: November 2, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated: October 19, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read
Education Briefly Stated: October 12, 2022
Here's a look at some recent Education Week articles you may have missed.
8 min read