Education

A Note to Our Readers

August 23, 2016 3 min read
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Education Week, which marks its 35th anniversary with the start of the 2016-17 school year, has continued to evolve to best serve you, our readers. We’ve always looked for new ways to track and explain news and trends in American education during the past three-plus decades of ferment in pre-K-12 policy. As a print subscriber, you can tap into our full array of online resources at edweek.org, from breaking news and wide-ranging opinion, to video and multimedia, to special reporting packages and our unparalleled archives.

As the evolution of Education Week continues, our mix of 37 print issues in 2016-17 will now include six topical special reports presented in a stand-alone magazine format that lets us showcase our distinctive deep-dive reporting on subjects of particular interest. Watch for delivery of your Education Week “magazine” issues (just under 8½ by 11 inches in size) on these topics as part of your print subscription:

  • Moving the needle on student achievement (Sept. 28);
  • Effective approaches to personalized learning (Oct. 19);
  • Teaching reading in the digital age (Nov. 9);
  • Navigating the new landscape of curriculum resources (March 29, 2017);
  • Smart strategies for teacher PD (April 26); and
  • Assessment at a crossroads (May 24).

Your subscription also includes three signature Education Week annual reports in a magazine format: Quality Counts, focused this year on what states and districts are doing to make the Every Student Succeeds Act a reality (Jan. 4, 2017); Leaders To Learn From, our spotlight on innovative and effective district-level leadership (Feb. 22); and Technology Counts, which will explore the state of digital learning (June 14). The Counts reports will include the kinds of benchmark data and indices educators have come to rely on.

All three annual reports and six topical special reports will also be available online with web-exclusive features and related resources.

Regular issues. Continue to look, meanwhile, for one-of-a-kind Education Week reporting, analysis, research, special projects, information graphics, and news summaries in 28 regular issues throughout the year. You’ll find, for instance, fresh insights into the field’s pressing issues—from student discipline to perceptions of the common core—through exclusive data-driven journalism from education’s top beat reporters.

Fresh opinion. Stay current on pre-K-12’s most thoughtful, and thought-provoking, opinion in Education Week‘s Commentary section. We take no editorial positions, but we want Education Week to be your must-read source—online and in print—for the voices and viewpoints that drive a lively but civil discourse on the challenges, successes, and future direction of education.

Multiple platforms. Starting with the launch of edweek.org in 1996, we’ve embraced new media platforms to bring you the news and analysis you need in the formats most convenient for you.

Even though “Week” is in our name, we publish more than 40 articles and other content online each weekday. You can’t find this breadth of pre-K-12 coverage anywhere else, and it’s yours, as a subscriber, to access at any time, on every device.

Subscribers’ access. Make sure you don’t miss a single development that matters to you, your school, your district, or your organization. Claim your access to edweek.org as part of your subscription and keep up with our news and opinion blogs, web-first articles, news alerts, and e-newsletters. For instructions on getting full online access, go to edweek.org/go/claim, or call (800) 445-8250 for help.

If you don’t have your own Education Week subscription, go online to edweek.org/offer or use one of the subscription cards in this issue.

Suggestions? We’re committed to giving you the information and insight you need to do your job well and to be an effective leader in American education. If you have ideas or suggestions for how we can better help you or your colleagues, write to Executive Editor Gregory Chronister, at gchron@epe.org, or Managing Editor Kathleen Kennedy Manzo, at kmanzo@epe.org.

Thank you for being an Education Week reader.

—The Editors

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A version of this article appeared in the August 24, 2016 edition of Education Week as A Note to Our Readers

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