Executive Skills & Strategy News in Brief

In Pennsylvania, ‘Snow Day’ Could Be an Endangered Species

By Benjamin Herold — September 30, 2014 1 min read
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Snow days may soon be a thing of the past in Pennsylvania.

In the event of inclement weather and other unusual circumstances, the state’s 501 school districts will now have the option to use “nontraditional educational delivery methods,” such as cyber school, in order to keep kids learning.

“As we continue to advance through the 21st century, our education system is adapting to and actively using technology for the delivery of instruction and educational materials,” Carolyn Dumaresq, the state’s acting education secretary, said in a statement.

“The Flexible Instructional Days program offers schools the option to deliver instruction through the use of digital technology when students are prevented from physically being in the classroom.”

Pennsylvania schools will be able to use up to five such days beginning this school year, as long as they receive prior approval from the state education department. Approval will be contingent upon districts showing satisfactory plans for reaching students with disabilities, those without Internet access or home computers, and those with other special circumstances.

Last winter’s uncommonly snowy weather across much of the country helped prompt a re-examination of the “snow day” concept and the possibility of using e-learning opportunities to help keep schools running.

A similar policy is in place in Ohio.

The Keystone State’s school code required schools to offer at least 180 days or 900 hours of instruction to students in grades 1-6, and 990 hours in grades 7-12.

A version of this article appeared in the October 01, 2014 edition of Education Week as In Pennsylvania, ‘Snow Day’ Could Be an Endangered Species

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