Pennsylvania

In this photo taken Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, Mary Beth Tinker, 61, shows an old photograph of her with her brother John Tinker to the Associated Press during an interview in Washington. Tinker was just 13 when she spoke out against the Vietnam War by wearing a black armband to her Iowa school in 1965. When the school suspended her, she took her free speech case all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court and won. Her message: Students should take action on issues important to them. "It's better for our whole society when kids have a voice," she says.
In this 2013 photo, Mary Beth Tinker shows a 1968 Associated Press photograph of her with her brother John Tinker displaying the armbands they had worn in school to protest the Vietnam War. (The peace symbols were added after the school protest). The Tinkers have filed a brief in the U.S. Supreme Court supporting a Pennsylvania student who was disciplined for an offensive message on Snapchat.
Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP
Law & Courts Diverse Array of Groups Back Student in Supreme Court Case on Off-Campus Speech
John and Mary Beth Tinker, central to the landmark speech case that bears their name, argue that even offensive speech merits protection.
Mark Walsh, April 1, 2021
5 min read
A memorial dedicated to former student Ava Lerario is posted in a hallway at Panther Valley Elementary School on March 11, 2021, in Nesquehoning, Pa. On May 26, 2020, former student, 9-year-old Ava Lerario; her mother, Ashley Belson, and Ava's father, Marc Lerario, were found fatally shot inside their home.
A memorial dedicated to former student Ava Lerario is posted in a hallway at Panther Valley Elementary School on March 11, 2021, in Nesquehoning, Pa. On May 26, 2020, former student, 9-year-old Ava Lerario; her mother, Ashley Belson, and Ava's father, Marc Lerario, were found fatally shot inside their home.
Matt Slocum/AP
Education Reports of Child Abuse From School Sources Fell Sharply During the Pandemic
At-risk children can be invisible to the system without the attention of an in-person school environment, a new analysis finds.
The Associated Press, March 29, 2021
12 min read
Early Childhood How Two Child-Care Centers Put Competition Aside and Created a Partnership During COVID-19
Due to COVID-19, two early-childhood centers put their competition aside to work together to support families during the pandemic.
Charles Dinofrio, November 1, 2020
7 min read
School buses remain parked in a storage area due to COVID-related school closures earlier this year in Zelienople, Pa.
School buses remain parked in a storage area due to COVID-related school closures earlier this year in Zelienople, Pa.
Keith Srakocic/AP
School & District Management Districts Offer Cash to Families Who Skip the School Bus
Facing big transportation costs due to the COVID-19 pandemic, some school districts will pay parents or caregivers to get their kids to school, or charge them for the bus ride.
Daarel Burnette II, September 10, 2020
5 min read
Chicago Teachers Union members and hundreds of supporters rally in Federal Plaza in the Loop to call for the Chicago Board of Education to vote to end a $33 million contract between Chicago Public Schools and the Chicago Police Department on Wednesday, June 24, 2020.
Chicago Teachers Union members and hundreds of supporters rally in Federal Plaza in the Loop to call for the Chicago Board of Education to vote to end a $33 million contract between Chicago Public Schools and the Chicago Police Department on Wednesday, June 24, 2020.
Ashlee Rezin Garcia/Chicago Sun-Times via AP
Equity & Diversity Photos Educators Rally for Police-Free Schools
Parents, students and teachers from across the country are protesting the presence of police in schools.
Bridget Fetsko, June 26, 2020
1 min read
BRIC ARCHIVE
Getty
Teaching Artificial Intelligence in K-12: The Right Mix for Learning or a Bad Idea?
The rapid shift to tech-driven, remote learning this spring has infused more technology into K-12 education, but AI tools still remain on the fringe.
David Rauf, May 19, 2020
9 min read
Debbie Williams, a 1st grade teacher at Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary School in Yakima, Wash., scrolls through a math book as she plans lessons for her students while school buildings are closed due to the coronavirus. Districts across the country are trying to provide professional development on the fly to help teachers better prepare remote learning lessons.
Debbie Williams, a 1st grade teacher at Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary School in Yakima, Wash., scrolls through a math book as she plans lessons for her students while school buildings are closed due to the coronavirus. Districts across the country are trying to provide professional development on the fly to help teachers better prepare remote learning lessons.
Amanda Ray/Yakima Herald-Republic via AP
Professional Development How Districts Are Helping Teachers Get Better at Tech Under Coronavirus
Educators are struggling to learn how to use new tech tools—devices, apps, software, and online textbooks—in greater volume than ever before.
David Rauf, April 22, 2020
11 min read
Terrell Bell, wearing a protective face mask, looks at a learning guide he picked up last month for his little sister at John H. Webster Elementary School in Philadelphia. The school district is struggling to figure out how to keep students leaning during building closures.
Terrell Bell, wearing a protective face mask, looks at a learning guide he picked up last month for his little sister at John H. Webster Elementary School in Philadelphia. The school district is struggling to figure out how to keep students leaning during building closures.
AP Photo/Matt Rourke
Classroom Technology Teach New Content or Review Familiar Material? A Tough Call During Coronavirus Closures
Schools must make the critical decision whether to reinforce the learning that students have already done this year or introduce new content.
Sarah Schwartz, April 17, 2020
11 min read
The school board in Scranton, Pa., hosted a public meeting on Zoom to discuss the annual budget.
The school board in Scranton, Pa., hosted a public meeting on Zoom to discuss the annual budget.
School & District Management Hacked and Cut Off From the Public: This Is School Board Business in the Coronavirus Crisis
Social distancing is forcing school business to be conducted virtually, putting school boards in the difficult spot of making crucial decisions on spending and other issues without the same level of public input.
Daarel Burnette II, April 8, 2020
4 min read
Tina Lawson, a lawyer whose children attended schools in the Upper Dublin school district in suburban Philadelphia, helped organize a group of black parents to pursue legal action against the district for steering black students into low-level courses and applying uneven discipline rates for students of color.
Tina Lawson, a lawyer whose children attended schools in the Upper Dublin school district in suburban Philadelphia, helped organize a group of black parents to pursue legal action against the district for steering black students into low-level courses and applying uneven discipline rates for students of color.
Ryan Collerd for Education Week
Families & the Community Black Parents Force District to End Academic Tracking
Fed up with their district’s unmet pledges to stop steering African American students into low-level classes, parents take action.
Denisa R. Superville, March 3, 2020
11 min read
States Educational Opportunities and Performance in Pennsylvania
This Quality Counts 2020 Highlights Report captures all the data you need to assess your state's performance on key educational outcomes.
January 21, 2020
5 min read
Education A Big Charter School Struggle Has Been Galvanized by a Democratic Governor
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf, a Democrat, has become increasingly critical of charter schools this year, and his new proposals for charters would change how they operate and how they are funded.
Andrew Ujifusa, August 18, 2019
3 min read
States Watch: A Year After Parkland Shooting, States Counting on Student Tips to Help Prevent School Violence
A year after the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida, more states are setting up anonymous tip lines to help prevent school violence. Learn more about their efforts, and the challenges that come with them, in this video report.
Evie Blad, February 13, 2019
2 min read
Hate In Schools Cover
Vanessa Solis/Education Week
School Climate & Safety Project Hate in Schools
Data on hate-related incidents in schools are skimpy, but it's clear hate and intolerance are being boldly expressed in some schools.
Francisco Vara-Orta, August 6, 2018
27 min read