Pennsylvania

Teacher Lisanne Brown wears a panther costume as she exits William Dick Elementary along with teacher Ann Marie Schamper in North Philadelphia on May 6, 2021. Teachers and staff at the school took extraordinary measures to keep attendance high this school year despite the challenges of learning online. Brown dressed up as the school mascot every week and walked around the neighborhood to surprise students who had high attendance.
Teacher Lisanne Brown wears a panther costume as she exits William Dick Elementary along with teacher Ann Marie Schamper in North Philadelphia on May 6, 2021. Teachers and staff at the school took extraordinary measures to keep attendance high this school year despite the challenges of learning online. Brown dressed up as the school mascot every week and walked around the neighborhood to surprise students who had high attendance.
Heather Khalifa/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP
Education A Panther Costume and an All-In Approach: How a Philly School Kept Families Engaged
Sending a large fuzzy mascot through North Philadelphia is just one of the things this school did to help engage students and families.
Jessica Calefati and Kristen A. Graham, The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 21, 2021
10 min read
Members of the Supreme Court pose for a group photo at the Supreme Court in Washington on April 23, 2021.
Members of the Supreme Court pose for a group photo at the Supreme Court in Washington on April 23, 2021.
Erin Schaff/The New York Times via AP
Law & Courts Some Takeaways for Educators in Supreme Court Rulings on Obamacare, Religious Liberties
The justices rejected a challenge to Obamacare on standing grounds while ruling narrowly in a case involving foster care in Philadelphia.
Mark Walsh, June 17, 2021
6 min read
Students participate in class outside at the Woodland Pond School, a private school  located near Bangor, Maine. Maine experienced one of the nation's largest drops in student enrollment this school year, according to an EdWeek analysis.
Students participate in class outside at the Woodland Pond School, a private school located near Bangor, Maine. Maine experienced one of the nation's largest drops in student enrollment this school year, according to an EdWeek analysis.
Photo courtesy of Woodland Pond School
School & District Management More Than 1 Million Students Didn't Enroll During the Pandemic. Will They Come Back?
Education Week analyzed state data to gather a more comprehensive understanding of this year's enrollment loss.
Eesha Pendharkar, June 17, 2021
6 min read
Illustration of C letter grade
Getty
States From Our Research Center State Grades on School Finance: 2021 Map and Rankings
Examine the grades and scores that states and the nation earned on school finance, along with how they scored on a host of indicators.
EdWeek Research Center, June 1, 2021
1 min read
Illustration of C letter grade
Getty
Education Funding From Our Research Center Nation Earns a 'C' on School Finance, Reflecting Inconsistency in K-12 Funding and Equity
The Edweek Research Center's latest analysis finds a gulf in many states between per-pupil spending and how that K-12 money goes out.
6 min read
Members of the Supreme Court pose for a group photo at the Supreme Court in Washington on April 23, 2021.
Members of the U.S. Supreme Court pose for a group photo at the court on April 23. The justices heard arguments Wednesday in a major case on student speech.
Erin Schaff/The New York Times via AP
Law & Courts U.S. Supreme Court Wary About Extending School Authority Over Student Internet Speech
In arguments, the justices looked for a narrow way to decide a case about the discipline of a cheerleader over a profane Snapchat message.
Mark Walsh, April 28, 2021
7 min read
Image of kids with backpacks running outdoors.
iStock/Getty
Student Well-Being How Educators Are Approaching Summer Learning This Year
After a difficult year, schools adjust what's best for students as they customize summer learning, enrichment, and play opportunities.
Andrew Ujifusa, April 27, 2021
9 min read
Teacher Salary Rankings 04262021 943331302
iStock/Getty Images Plus
Teaching Profession Teacher Salaries Are Increasing. See How Your State Compares
The National Education Association warns that some of the progress in teacher pay could be jeopardized by the pandemic.
Madeline Will, April 26, 2021
2 min read
Image shows a picture of Brandi Levy in her cheerleading uniform in front of Mahanoy Area High School.
Brandi Levy, 18, through her parents, sued her school district under the First Amendment’s free speech clause over her discipline for an off-campus Snapchat message.
Danna Singer/Provided by the American Civil Liberties Union
Law & Courts 7 Things to Know About the Cheerleader Speech Case Coming Up in the U.S. Supreme Court
The justices hear arguments on Wednesday in the case about whether school officials may discipline students for off-campus speech.
Mark Walsh, April 24, 2021
4 min read
Conceptual finance image of large group of flying money of American one hundred dollar bills in binary coded tunnel
iStock/Getty Images Plus
IT Management Schools Are Flush With Stimulus Money. Will They Waste It on Unproven Technology?
Districts are throwing billions of dollars at ed tech that could be ineffective, underutilized, and come with hidden long-term costs.
Benjamin Herold, April 20, 2021
8 min read
Image of Brandi Levy.
Brandi Levy, now an 18-year-old college freshman, was a cheerleader at Mahanoy Area High School in Pennsylvania when she made profane comments on Snapchat that are now at the center of a U.S. Supreme Court case on student speech rights.
Danna Singer/Provided by the American Civil Liberties Union
Law & Courts How a Cheerleader's Snapchat Profanity Could Shape the Limits of Students' Free Speech
Brandi Levy's social media post is the basis for a case before the U.S. Supreme Court on whether schools may punish off-campus speech.
Mark Walsh, April 12, 2021
9 min read
In this photo taken Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2013, Mary Beth Tinker, 61, shows an old photograph of her with her brother John Tinker to the Associated Press during an interview in Washington. Tinker was just 13 when she spoke out against the Vietnam War by wearing a black armband to her Iowa school in 1965. When the school suspended her, she took her free speech case all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court and won. Her message: Students should take action on issues important to them. "It's better for our whole society when kids have a voice," she says.
In this 2013 photo, Mary Beth Tinker shows a 1968 Associated Press photograph of her with her brother John Tinker displaying the armbands they had worn in school to protest the Vietnam War. (The peace symbols were added after the school protest). The Tinkers have filed a brief in the U.S. Supreme Court supporting a Pennsylvania student who was disciplined for an offensive message on Snapchat.
Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP
Law & Courts Diverse Array of Groups Back Student in Supreme Court Case on Off-Campus Speech
John and Mary Beth Tinker, central to the landmark speech case that bears their name, argue that even offensive speech merits protection.
Mark Walsh, April 1, 2021
5 min read
States From Our Research Center State and National Highlights Reports (Quality Counts 2021)
The Quality Counts 2021 State Highlights Reports capture the key data you need to assess your state’s performance.
January 19, 2021
Early Childhood How Two Child-Care Centers Put Competition Aside and Created a Partnership During COVID-19
Due to COVID-19, two early-childhood centers put their competition aside to work together to support families during the pandemic.
Charles Dinofrio, November 1, 2020
7 min read