Ed-Tech Policy

Technology Bill Approved

By James Crawford — April 01, 1987 2 min read
Bilingual Education
Overview
Bilingual Education Traces Its U.S. Roots to the Colonial Era
Bilingual Policy Has Taken Shape Along Two Federal Tracks
California Vote Gives Boost To ‘English-Only’ Movement
Bilingual Education Traces Its U.S. Roots to the Colonial Era
Officials, Educators Reach No Consensus on Research
Language-Acquisition Theory Revolutionizing Instruction
Bilingualism: Advantage or Disadvantage for Children?
Debate Over Effectiveness Has Shaped Federal Policy
G.A.O. Findings Run Counter to U.S. Education Department Views
The Special Case of Bilingual Education for Indian Students
California Program Grapples With Problems, Scores Successes
Technology Bill Approved
Commentary: The Essential Elements Of Literacy

Legislation to promote the use of telecommunications technology to compensate for the shortage of mathematics, science, and foreign-language teachers last week won the approval of the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee.

The bill, S778, would authorize $100 million over the next five years to aid states and multi-state consortiums in acquiring satellite-communications hardware. The “star schools program’’ is designed to enable educational networks to transmit lessons to many schools, including those in isolated locations.

Teacher Shortages

Senator Edward M. Kennedy, the Massachusetts Democrat who is the measure’s principal sponsor, said the bill could provide a relatively inexpensive solution to the problem of teacher shortages.

“The National Science Board reports that by 1995 we will need twice as many teachers in math and science as we have today,’' Mr. Kennedy said. “But for every qualified math and science [graduate] entering the [teaching] field, 13 are leaving for greener pastures.’'

“The cost of a traditional national program to recruit, train, hire, and upgrade the nation’s math and science teachers, so that American students would have qualified instruction, is between $10 billion and $20- billion,’' the Senator estimated.

In contrast, the star program would have a funding ceiling of $60- million in a single year, he said. Also, the program would encourage “cooperation between businesses, secondary schools, teacher-training centers, and the higher-education community’’ to explore the possibilities of new technology.

Those receiving grants will be required to provide a description of their networks’ course offerings to the Education Department, Mr. Kennedy said. “Over time, the program will become a national project of shared education resources.’'

The measure also would require the Office of Technology Assessment, a Congressional research agency, to study the feasibility of “designing, building, and launching a satellite for educational purposes and [to analyze] the ability of users of such a system to repay the costs.’'

In other action, the Senate subcommittee on education, arts, and the humanities approved S 320, a measure to support dropout-prevention and re-entry demonstration projects. The bill would provide $50 million in grants to schools for such efforts to help “at risk’’ youths.

A similar measure passed the House last year, but not the Senate. The full Labor and Human Resources Committee is expected to vote on the dropout-prevention program this week.

A version of this article appeared in the April 01, 1987 edition of Education Week as Technology Bill Approved

Events

Jobs The EdWeek Top School Jobs Virtual Career Fair
Find teaching jobs and other jobs in K-12 education at the EdWeek Top School Jobs virtual career fair.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Mathematics Webinar
Engaging Young Students to Accelerate Math Learning
Join learning scientists and inspiring district leaders, for a timely panel discussion addressing a school district’s approach to doubling and tripling Math gains during Covid. What started as a goal to address learning gaps in
Content provided by Age of Learning & Digital Promise, Harlingen CISD
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Webinar
How to Power Your Curriculum With Digital Books
Register for this can’t miss session looking at best practices for utilizing digital books to support their curriculum.
Content provided by OverDrive

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Ed-Tech Policy Q&A Acting FCC Chair: The 'Homework Gap' Is an 'Especially Cruel' Reality During the Pandemic
Under the new leadership of Jessica Rosenworcel, the FCC is exploring broadening the E-Rate to cover home-connectivity needs.
5 min read
Internet connectivity doesn't reach all the houses
Vanessa Solis/Education Week and iStock/Getty
Ed-Tech Policy Millions of Students Got Free Home Internet for Remote Learning. How Long Will It Last?
Time and money are running out on temporary agreements between districts and ISPs. Broadband advocates want a federal solution.
10 min read
Cupped hands hold a precious wi-fi symbol
Vanessa Solis/Education Week and Digital Vision Vectors/Getty
Ed-Tech Policy FCC Takes One Step Closer to Offering E-Rate Funds for Remote Learning Technology
Advocates have urged the FCC to loosen its rules on E-Rate funds so schools can pay for technology that helps students learn remotely.
2 min read
Andrew Burstein, 13, participates in a virtual class through Don Estridge High Tech Middle School in Delray Beach, Fla., this school year.
Andrew Burstein, 13, participates in a virtual class through Don Estridge High Tech Middle School in Delray Beach, Fla., this school year.
Joe Cavaretta/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP
Ed-Tech Policy New York Banned Facial Recognition in Schools. Will Other States Follow?
New York schools are prohibited from using the widely criticized biometric identifying technology until at least July 2022.
3 min read
Girl looking into smartphone facial recognition
Getty