Special Education Video

Supporting Students with Learning Differences during Coronavirus

By Bridget Fetsko — June 10, 2020 3:14

The coronavirus pandemic and distance learning environment have brought new challenges for students of all abilities. In the final piece of this three-part series, parents of students with learning differences share the sadness they’ve seen in their children – from missing things as basic as the school mashed potatoes, to needing the structure of school to thrive. There’s a hope that things will go back to normal, but a lot of uncertainty around how long it’ll take to get there. As they do their best to build schedules and find new routines that work for their kids, they’re also trying to address the trauma this has caused, and hope the return to school will address those needs.

Bridget Fetsko
Visuals Intern Education Week
Bridget Fetsko is a former visuals intern for Education Week.

Coverage of students with diverse learning needs is supported in part by a grant from the Oak Foundation, at www.oakfnd.org. Education Week retains sole editorial control over the content of this coverage.

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