Teaching Profession

UPDATED: To Fund Edujobs Bill, Dems Would Cut Performance Pay

By Stephen Sawchuk — June 30, 2010 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Politics K-12 has the potentially explosive news that House Democrats want to rescind money from several of the Obama administration’s key reform programs, including the federal Teacher Incentive Fund, in order to help finance $10 billion to preserve education jobs. TIF supports local performance-based compensation systems for educators. Other programs they’re eyeing include the Race to the Top Fund and a charter school innovation

The important implication here is that congressional Dems, and especially David Obey, the chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, aren’t on board with the direction Obama and Education Secretary Arne Duncan are moving in education reform. Obey, in a hearing earlier this year, clearly telegraphed that he thought preserving jobs was more important than advancing reform.

Some folks are wondering if this is even legal. But my understanding, and please write in to let us know if this isn’t correct, is that as long as discretionary funding isn’t actually obligated or disbursed to a grantee, it’s well within Congress’ purview to yank it back. And we know from past experience with TIF that appropriators do pay attention to what agencies spend. Back in 2006-07, the Education Department dawdled in obligating its first TIF dollars, and appropriators refused to give the fund any more until the first batch was out the door.

The big winner in this situation? The teachers’ unions, who have been pushing for an education jobs fund and have found lots to criticize in TIF, the Race to the Top, and charter schools. Cynics will no doubt claim that House Dems, in addition to putting a big “Kick Me” sign on Arne Duncan’s back, are engaging in bit of pre-election pandering to the unions.

UPDATE: AFT officials say that while they support the bill, the union preferred the earlier $23 billion proposal that didn’t cut TIF or RTT. The union did not know in advance which programs would be offset.

All of this still has a long legislative path to navigate before it’s enacted. First, the proposal must make it through the Rules Committee, and then past the House floor and the Senate.

But no matter what happens, it’s a sign that there’s trouble in edu-paradise.

A version of this news article first appeared in the Teacher Beat blog.


Commenting has been disabled on edweek.org effective Sept. 8. Please visit our FAQ section for more details. To get in touch with us visit our contact page, follow us on social media, or submit a Letter to the Editor.


Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Teaching Webinar
What’s Next for Teaching and Learning? Key Trends for the New School Year
The past 18 months changed the face of education forever, leaving teachers, students, and families to adapt to unprecedented challenges in teaching and learning. As we enter the third school year affected by the pandemic—and
Content provided by Instructure
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Webinar
How Data and Digital Curriculum Can Drive Personalized Instruction
As we return from an abnormal year, it’s an educator’s top priority to make sure the lessons learned under adversity positively impact students during the new school year. Digital curriculum has emerged from the pandemic
Content provided by Kiddom
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Equity & Diversity Webinar
Leadership for Racial Equity in Schools and Beyond
While the COVID-19 pandemic continues to reveal systemic racial disparities in educational opportunity, there are revelations to which we can and must respond. Through conscientious efforts, using an intentional focus on race, school leaders can
Content provided by Corwin

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Teaching Profession We Feel Your Grief: Remembering the 1,000 Plus Educators Who've Died of COVID-19
The heartbreaking tally of lives lost to the coronavirus continues to rise and take a steep toll on school communities.
3 min read
090321 1000 Educators Lost BS
Education Week
Teaching Profession Letter to the Editor Educators Have a Responsibility to Support the Common Good
A science teacher responds to another science teacher's hesitation to take the COVID-19 vaccine.
1 min read
Teaching Profession With Vaccine Mandates on the Rise, Some Teachers May Face Discipline
With a vaccine now fully FDA-approved, more states and districts will likely require school staff get vaccinated. The logistics are tricky.
9 min read
Grace John, who works at a school in San Lorenzo, gets a COVID-19 shot at a mobile vaccination clinic run by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the state in Hayward, Calif., on Feb. 19, 2021. California will become the first state in the nation to require all teachers and school staff to get vaccinated or undergo weekly COVID-19 testing. The statewide vaccine mandate for K-12 educators comes as schools return from summer break amid growing concerns of the highly contagious delta variant.
Grace John, who works at a school in San Lorenzo, gets a COVID-19 shot at a mobile vaccination clinic in Hayward, Calif. California is among those states requiring all teachers and school staff to get vaccinated or undergo weekly COVID-19 testing.
Terry Chea/AP
Teaching Profession In Their Own Words Why This Science Teacher Doesn't Want the COVID Vaccine
Contrary to public health guidance, Davis Eidahl, an Iowa high school teacher, has no plans to get the COVID-19 vaccine.
4 min read
Davis Eidahl, a science teacher at Pekin High School in Packwood, Iowa, says he doesn't want to get the COVID-19 vaccine. He thinks social distancing and occasional masking will be sufficient to keep himself and others safe.
Davis Eidahl, a science teacher at Pekin High School in Packwood, Iowa, says he doesn't want to get the COVID-19 vaccine. He thinks social distancing and occasional masking will be sufficient to keep himself and others safe.
Rachel Mummey for Education Week