Curriculum News in Brief

Texas Limiting Influence of AP History Course

By The Associated Press — September 23, 2014 1 min read
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Amid an uproar in conservative circles about perceived anti-American bias in the new Advanced Placement U.S. History course and exam, Texas moved last week to require its high school students to learn only state-mandated curriculum, not be taught to the national test.

The state school board tentatively approved a measure declaring that the history curriculum its members set trumps that covered by AP.

The controversy stems from the recent overhaul of the AP program that was meant to de-emphasize memorization. It includes a lengthy framework to help teachers better prepare students for the requirements.

Conservative activists have decried the new course, the framework, and the exam itself as rife with liberal themes and focused on negative aspects of U.S. history.

A version of this article appeared in the September 24, 2014 edition of Education Week as Texas Limiting Influence of AP History Course

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