Teaching

Special Educators’ Group Sets Standards for Restraint and Seclusion

September 24, 2009 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

The Council for Exceptional Children, a professional association for special educators, has announced a policy on the use of physical restraint and seclusion in school settings. The group hopes to establish as a professional standard that such procedures should only be used as a last resort when a child or others are in immediate danger, the policy says.

The group is also pushing for new laws that would require data on restraint and seclusion be reported to outside agencies, such as state or provincial departments of education.

“This policy indicates the high professional ethics and standards the special education community holds itself to,” CEC President Kathleen Pucket said in a statement. “There are numerous evidence-based practices that do not involve physical restraints or seclusion that teachers and school personnel may use to manage challenging behaviors. Restraint and seclusion procedures, if used at all, must be implemented properly. One child harmed is one too many.”

The policy said neither restraint nor seclusion should be used as a punishment to force compliance. Interventions for children with behavior problems should focus on prevention and positive behavioral supports. School staff should be required to have training on how to avoid and defuse crisis and conflicts. There must be an adult supervising any child in seclusion. If a school uses physical restraint or seclusion procedures, there should be a written positive behavior-support plan and pre-established emergency procedures, the policy says.

Readers can view CEC’s full policy on physical restraint and seclusion here.

A version of this news article first appeared in the On Special Education blog.

Events

Recruitment & Retention Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table: Chronic Teacher Shortage: Where Do We Go From Here?  
Join Peter DeWitt, Michael Fullan, and guests for expert insights into finding solutions for the teacher shortage.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Science Webinar
Close the Gender Gap: Getting Girls Excited about STEM
Join female STEM leaders as they discuss the importance of early cheerleaders, real life role models, and female networks of support.
Content provided by Logitech
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Achievement Webinar
Mission Possible: Saving Time While Improving Student Outcomes
Learn how district leaders are maximizing instructional time and finding the best resources for student success through their MTSS framework.
Content provided by Panorama Education

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Teaching Opinion What Makes for Valuable Feedback? Teachers Weigh In
Knowing how to integrate the feedback into your practice can be a transformative experience.
9 min read
Images shows colorful speech bubbles that say "Q," "&," and "A."
iStock/Getty
Teaching How Should Schools Celebrate 100 Days of School? Educators Are Split
The tradition of asking students and staff to dress up as a 100-year-olds is especially polarizing.
4 min read
Image of a child dressed like a senior citizen with a cane.
chuckcollier/E+ and EdWeek
Teaching Opinion 5 Reasons Educators Take On Too Much
Educators feel overworked, but what if they needlessly contribute to that burden?
5 min read
5 FCG
Peter DeWitt through Canva
Teaching Opinion Educators Need to Get With the AI Program. ChatGPT, More Specifically
AI tools offer teachers a great opportunity to prepare students for all the good—and the not so good—that they can do.
14 min read
Images shows colorful speech bubbles that say "Q," "&," and "A."
iStock/Getty