Curriculum

SEC Wants Teachers to Learn Their Retirement Needs

By Bess Keller — November 15, 2005 1 min read
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403(b)? Equity index? Contingent-deferred-sales load?

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission offers teachers resources on retirement .

If you are an educator and these terms leave you as blank as a blackboard in July, the federal Securities and Exchange Commission last month began offering lessons that will wise you up.

Public school teachers generally have government-underwritten pensions, but that doesn’t mean they can afford to ignore putting money aside regularly or planning for retirement, the SEC says on a listing on its Web site. The agency is the federal government’s primary overseer and regulator of U.S. securities markets.

“We’ve noticed that teachers devote so much of themselves and their resources to their students they sometimes overlook their own needs, such as planning for a secure retirement,” the site says under its “For Teachers and Students” heading.

There, teachers will find primers on savings, retirement options, and investments, as well as calculators that can be used to estimate retirement-plan savings, retirement financial needs, and the costs of various mutual funds.

Educators can also click for a package of publications about wise investment decisions.

For students and teachers, the site provides a guide to help young people learn about saving and investing, a “Money Smarts” interactive quiz, posters for the classroom, and links to curriculum resources.

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