Opinion
Curriculum Opinion

Connecting Children to World Issues Through Wellness

March 05, 2015 5 min read

Wellness activities are a great opportunity to help children to think and act both locally and globally. Daniel W. Hatcher, National Out-of-School Advisor, Alliance for a Healthier Generation, shares practical ideas and resources. This post is part of our ongoing partnership with BOOST’s Breakfast blog.

by guest blogger Daniel W. Hatcher

Although the facts are alarming, conveying the importance of wellness to children can be challenging. Childhood obesity has almost tripled in children and adolescents in the past 30 years and today approximately one out of three children and adolescents in the United States is overweight or obese. Even more alarming, there are significant racial and ethnic disparities in obesity prevalence among U.S. children and adolescents.

Research shows a strong link between a young person’s practice of healthy habits, including a good diet and regular physical activity, and an improvement in their overall life outcomes. Encouraging healthy habits is an opportunity for children to relate to the larger world and see how their daily experience compares to others. Providing young people with an opportunity to take a leadership role in assessing and taking action on the most critical health issues of their community provides an opportunity for them to not only improve their own personal health, but also contribute to solving some of the world’s most pressing issues.

Getting the Conversation Started
Here’s a quick activity to start the conversation and help children (and adults) think about the contributing factors to health in their community:


  • Start by drawing a large river on a big sheet of paper. You can use a blue marker or even blue painters tape. I used glitter tape once that students loved.
  • Next, ask students, “What do you call the smaller rivers that feed into a larger river?” Hopefully, you’ll get “tributary” as a response.
  • Explain that our communities are like rivers: many things contribute to how healthy they are.
  • Next, ask for examples of contributing factors. Typically when I Iead this activity I hear things like “safety,” “pollution,” “access to healthy food,” “transportation,” and “public parks” orplaygrounds.”

This simple yet effective activity is an interactive way to help students begin to think about the different facets of their community and provides a bridge to many common issues that communities face. Encourage students to think about how these factors change depending on where a person lives. If you have a room of children from different communities, have them compare and share.

As children begin to identify community challenges and opportunities, you can dive deeper and make global connections in each of these topic areas. Below are just a few opportunities.

Food Insecurity and Hunger
One issue to explore is local food access and the connection to the issue of global hunger. Here are a few ways to get started:

Nature and the Environment
A second topic to explore is the relationship between health, nature, and environmental issues:


  • Use interactive enrichment programs like Food and Fun and empowerME4Life to encourage children to learn about the importance of fruits and vegetables and whole grains.
  • Leverage Nature Conservancy resources on global agriculture to help children understand the connection between conservation and food.
  • Encourage students to self-organize and plan events for World Water Day and World Food Day. Both days provide an opportunity for students to see how their local experience can drive international movements.

Sport and Youth Development
The availability of organized sports is another topic to consider:

Service Learning and Community Action
As you lead the river activity, encourage students to think about how they can address the challenges they identify using service learning:


  • Use the planning guide provided by the Jane Goodall Institute’s Roots & Shoots youth-led community action and learning program. Through the program, young people assess their community, prioritize challenges and create an action plan.
  • Youth Service America also has topic specific planning guides (such as childhood obesity) for Global Youth Service Day (GYSD), and grant opportunities for youth-led action. GYSD is the largest service event in the world and the only one dedicated to the contributions that children and youth make 365 days of the year.

Youth Voice and Dialogue


  • Activities like Photovoice are additional opportunities for students to explore wellness challenges and opportunities in their community. Imagine students equipped with cameras (even just camera phones) with a critical eye to how the physical environment impacts their health. How can youth documenting availability of bike lanes, sidewalks, or the abundance of corner stores to help them understand that where a person lives impacts her ability to live a healthy life?
  • The University of Kansas Community Tool Box has advice on starting a Photovoice project and Active Living Research has additional resources on urban design, transportation, and parks. Designed to Move further explores the global challenge of physical inactivity.
  • Encourage students to share their findings with parents, local government officials, and teachers. Perhaps student clubs can work together on action planning.
  • Further raise youth voice locally by hosting your own Youth-Hosted Forum student discussion panel on health and wellness issues.

Wellness activities provide a tremendous opportunity to help young people connect with issues that they are passionate about and that are meaningful to their community. By helping students understand the far reaching impact of local wellness issues, young people are positioned to raise their voices and take action. From food insecurity to the environment and sport, a multitude of resources and organizations exist to support the effort to help young people think locally and globally.

Follow Daniel, Alliance for a Healthier Generation, BOOST, Asia Society, and Heather on Twitter.

Photo courtesy of Alliance for a Healthier Generation.

Related Tags:

The opinions expressed in Global Learning are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

Events

Jobs The EdWeek Top School Jobs Virtual Career Fair
Find teaching jobs and other jobs in K-12 education at the EdWeek Top School Jobs virtual career fair.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Mathematics Webinar
Engaging Young Students to Accelerate Math Learning
Join learning scientists and inspiring district leaders, for a timely panel discussion addressing a school district’s approach to doubling and tripling Math gains during Covid. What started as a goal to address learning gaps in
Content provided by Age of Learning & Digital Promise, Harlingen CISD
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Webinar
How to Power Your Curriculum With Digital Books
Register for this can’t miss session looking at best practices for utilizing digital books to support their curriculum.
Content provided by OverDrive

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Whitepaper
The Digital Transformation in Elementary Education
This white paper reports on the impact of this digital transformation, highlighting the resources educators are most likely to use, their...
Content provided by Capstone
Curriculum School Halts Use of Fictional Book in Which Officer Kills a Black Child
Fifth graders in at least one Broward County school were assigned to read a book that critics say casts police officers as racist liars.
Rafael Olmeda, South Florida Sun-Sentinel
5 min read
Broward County School Board member Lori Alhadeff listens during a meeting of the Broward County School Board, Tuesday, March 5, 2019, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Broward County School Board member Lori Alhadeff listens during a meeting of the Broward County School Board in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Alhadeff told the South Florida Sun-Sentinel that she does not feel like the book "Ghost Boys" is appropriate for 5th graders.
Lynne Sladky/AP
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Whitepaper
Empowering Teachers for Student Success
Discover how teachers are effectively using databases with insights from educators who use Gale In Context: For Educators to collect, org...
Content provided by Gale
Curriculum Opinion Introducing Primary Sources to Students
Five educators share strategies for introducing primary sources to students, including English-language learners.
12 min read
Images shows colorful speech bubbles that say "Q," "&," and "A."
iStock/Getty