Teaching A National Roundup

Boston to Allow 10 Schools to Switch to Later Start Times

By Catherine Gewertz — March 13, 2007 1 min read

The Boston school district will allow 10 high schools to try starting their day later, a move designed to increase the number of teenagers who get to school on time.

In a unanimous vote March 7, the Boston School Committee approved a recommendation by Superintendent Michael G. Contompasis to allow the experiment to begin in September.

Most Boston high schools start at 7:20 a.m. The 10 schools, which have not yet been chosen, will be able to choose starting times ranging from 7:45 a.m. to 8:30 a.m.

Early high school starting times are often debated nationally in the face of research showing that adolescents’ body clocks make early rising particularly difficult for them.

In Boston, the issue is even thornier. Since students can choose to attend any high school citywide, many must travel long distances by public transportation each morning.

See Also

See other stories on education issues in Massachusetts. See data on Massachusetts’ public school system.

Copyright 2007 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
A version of this article appeared in the March 14, 2007 edition of Education Week

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