College & Workforce Readiness News in Brief

AP Program Revamps U.S. History, Physics

October 09, 2012 1 min read
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The College Board last week announced the release of redesigned Advanced Placement programs for U.S. history and physics. The changes focus on reducing the amount of content coverage required to allow more time for studying key concepts in greater depth. Schools will offer the revised courses starting in fall 2014.

New exams for both subjects will feature fewer multiple-choice questions and increase opportunities for students to apply their skills and knowledge. In Advanced Placement U.S. History, for instance, the number of multiple-choice questions will be chopped from 80 to 36.

For physics, the changes also involve replacing the Physics B course with two separate, yearlong courses titled AP Physics 1 and 2.

A version of this article appeared in the October 10, 2012 edition of Education Week as AP Program Revamps U.S. History, Physics

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