Federal News in Brief

U.S. Dept. of Ed. Awards Grants to Cover Fees for AP, IB Exams

By Alyson Klein — March 25, 2008 1 min read
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The U.S. Department of Education announced last week that it will award $11 million in grants to 39 states to help low-income students cover fees for Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate tests.

The grants ranged from $2,164 for the New Hampshire Department of Education to more than $3.5 million for the California Department of Education.

The money is aimed at helping students obtain credit for college courses during high school, shortening the time to graduation and reducing the cost of college.

“These grants will help more low-income students take advantage of the rigorous coursework they need to succeed in college and the workforce,” Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings said in a March 17 statement.

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A version of this article appeared in the March 26, 2008 edition of Education Week

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