States State of the States

Technology High Schools, Property-Tax Cuts Envisioned

By Bess Keller — January 09, 2007 1 min read

Vermont

Gov. James H. Douglas launched his third two-year term with an inaugural address last week picturing the Vermont of the near future as a center for environmental engineering. High schools specializing in math, science, and technology would dot the landscape, the Republican governor said.

Gov. James H. Douglas

As he did last year, Gov. Douglas called for slowing the rate of growth in school spending by capping the state property tax. Vermonters’ property taxes, the main revenue for schools, have been increasing at more than double the rate of inflation, according to the governor.

“I believe we can cap property taxes without compromising the quality and success of our schools,” he contended.

Sounding an increasingly common theme among governors and others, Gov. Douglas also urged better preparation of high school graduates for global economic competition. To that end, the governor proposed establishing regional high schools for math, science, and technology.

He promised that if lawmakers help him make Vermont the first “e-state,” with universal cellular and high-speed-computer coverage, students will benefit from learning opportunities around the world.

For More info
Read a complete transcript of Gov. James H. Douglas’ 2007 Inaugural Address. Posted by Vermont’s Office of the Governor.

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A version of this article appeared in the January 10, 2007 edition of Education Week

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