States A State Capitals Roundup

Pre-K Group Issues Report on Governors

By Linda Jacobson — April 26, 2005 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Governors in 20 states have proposed increasing aid for early-childhood education programs in their fiscal 2006 budgets, a second annual report that tracks spending on pre-K programs has found.

“Leadership Matters: Governors’ Pre-K Proposals Fiscal Year 2006 is posted by Pre-K Now. ()

At this time last year, 11 governors were recommending such increases, the report adds.

Released April 21 by Pre-K Now, a Washington-based advocacy organization, the report highlights five governors identified by the group as heroes because they “have overcome significant budget challenges to keep their promises to increase pre-K investment.”

Republican Gov. M. Jodi Rell of Connecticut, for example, has proposed a 20 percent increase—from $51.6 million to $62 million—for the state’s School Readiness Initiative, in spite of a $1 billion budget deficit.

And in Illinois, Democratic Gov. Rod R. Blagojevich has proposed a $30 million increase for the state’s Early Childhood Block Grant, showing that he intends to fulfill a promise to give three successive increases of that amount dating back to fiscal 2003. Roughly 90 percent of the aid has been earmarked for the state’s pre-K program for disadvantaged children, while the rest pays for services for infants and toddlers.

The other three governors singled out for their work are Republican Linda Lingle of Hawaii, Tom Vilsack of Iowa, a Democrat, and Phil Bredesen of Tennessee, also a Democrat.

“Effective strategic use of a leadership position in support of outstanding public policy is the mark of a great governor, and pre-K is just the kind of policy great governors are pursuing,” the report says.

Coming Up Short

The authors also point to states where they say governors have failed to make budget plans that live up to their talk about making school readiness a priority.

In Missouri, for example, Gov. Matt Blunt, a Republican, is proposing an 11 percent cut to what was appropriated in fiscal 2005 for the state’s Preschool Project.

“Missouri does not have one of the worst budget crises in the nation, but other governors in similar situations have still made the smart choice to invest in pre-K,” the report says.

But Jessica Robinson, a spokeswoman for Gov. Blunt, said the $14.8 million proposed for fiscal 2006 is actually more than the $13.4 million spent on the program in fiscal 2004.

Related Tags:

Events

Special Education Webinar Reading, Dyslexia, and Equity: Best Practices for Addressing a Threefold Challenge
Learn about proven strategies for instruction and intervention that support students with dyslexia.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Families & the Community Webinar
How Whole-Child Student Data Can Strengthen Family Connections
Learn how district leaders can use these actionable strategies to increase family engagement in their student’s education and boost their academic achievement.
Content provided by Panorama Education
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
College & Workforce Readiness Webinar
The School to Workforce Gap: How Are Schools Setting Students Up For Life & Lifestyle Success?
Hear from education and business leaders on how schools are preparing students for their leap into the workforce.
Content provided by Find Your Grind

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

States Educators Weigh K-12 Impact From an Unpredictable Election
Many of the most contentious issues in the 2022 midterms resonate most at the local level.
6 min read
"I Voted" stickers sit in a pile at the Fairview Recreation Center in North Minneapolis.
"I Voted" stickers sit in a pile at the Fairview Recreation Center in North Minneapolis during the midterm elections on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022.
Tim Evans/Minnesota Public Radio via AP
States K-12 and the Midterms: What to Watch For
Educators sound off on what the hard-fought midterm elections could mean for K-12 policy.
6 min read
Aidan Lau-Struck, 6, helps his mom Stephanie Lau feed her ballot into the machine at the Brighton Green Community Association voting precinct in North Chesterfield, Va., on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022.
Aidan Lau-Struck, 6, helps his mother, Stephanie Lau, feed her ballot into the machine at the Brighton Green Community Association voting precinct in North Chesterfield, Va., on Election Day.
Eva Russo/Richmond Times-Dispatch via AP
States K-12 Insider or Conservative Advocate? Stark Choice in One State Superintendent's Race
A think tank CEO and a high school English teacher battle it out for South Carolina's top K-12 job.
8 min read
Ellen Weaver, the Republican nominee for South Carolina superintendent of education, speaks at U.S. Rep. Jeff Duncan's Faith & Freedom BBQ ahead of the keynote speaker, former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, on Monday, Aug. 22, 2022, in Anderson, S.C.
Ellen Weaver, the Republican nominee for South Carolina superintendent of education, speaks at U.S. Rep. Jeff Duncan's Faith & Freedom BBQ in Anderson, S.C.
Meg Kinnard/AP
States School-Related Ballot Measures to Watch This Midterm Election
Voters in six states will decide on issues ranging from more funding for free school meals and the arts to reining in the state board.
7 min read
Image of ballots going into a box.
iStock/Getty