Federal

Obama’s Budget Would Eliminate EETT

By Kathleen Kennedy Manzo — February 03, 2010 2 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Over the last several months I’ve reported on how a number of ed-tech advocacy organizations have decried the shrinking investment in the federal Enhancing Education Through Technology, or EETT, program. Indeed, funding dropped from more than $700 million in the early years of the No Child Left Behind Act to just $100 million in fiscal 2010, although $650 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act this past year softened the blow.

Now President Obama has proposed eliminating the EETT grants in his fiscal 2011 budget proposal. Actually, his budget would consolidate technology funding into several new initiatives under the umbrella of the “Effective Teaching and Learning for a Complete Education” program.

“Incorporating the use of technology is integrated into many ESEA programs,” a footnote in the budget states. The budget describes the new program as “designed to improve instruction to support college- and career readiness standards, in part through the use of technology to deliver high-quality content.”

Ed-tech groups like CoSN, ISTE, and SETDA have been promoting greater integration of technology throughout the curriculum, but I don’t think this is what they had in mind. The new program seems to cover a lot of ground and could be interpreted as simply allowing or encouraging the use of technology to improve instruction, without actually mandating it.

There are three components of the Effective Teaching and Learning program, with $450 million for literacy, $300 million for STEM, and $265 million to support “a well-rounded education,” meaning teaching across content areas. Technology is included in each, but without much specificity as to how and how much.

CoSN, ISTE, and SETDA issued this joint statement today expressing their concerns:

We were very pleased to hear the Obama Administration's commitment to infusing technology across the range of its proposed programs and school reform initiatives announced this week. We fully concur that, as the President stated, 'Technology, when used creatively and effectively, can transform education and training.' We would like to see those sentiments translated into specific, tangible allocations that meaningfully incorporate technology throughout the Administration's new vision for ESEA and to the benefit of all students. In our view, a newly reauthorized ESEA must infuse technology across all program areas and be supported by targeted research, evaluation and investments that enhance state and local educational technology leadership and capacity, educator professional development, and technology-based innovation.

Last week, after the State of the Union Address, Don Knezek, ISTE’s chief executive officer, told me he was encouraged to hear the president talk about the need for a greater investment in the nation’s schools and for more innovation in general. But even then, Knezek was concerned that ed-tech would not be as much a part of that investment as he and other advocates were hoping for.

“Although I hear the innovation message, I hear the message about world-class standards for our schools and the need for kids to be globally competent, I don’t sense real support for changing the learning experience,” he said. “So far, we haven’t seen an eloquent articulation of the expectation that education across all fronts would move into the digital age.”

Of course, there’s still a long way to go before a final budget is out. Stay tuned.

Related Tags:

A version of this news article first appeared in the Digital Education blog.

Events

Jobs Virtual Career Fair for Teachers and K-12 Staff
Find teaching jobs and other jobs in K-12 education at the EdWeek Top School Jobs virtual career fair.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Mathematics Webinar
What is it About Math? Making Math Figure-Out-Able
Join Pam Harris for an engaging session challenging how we approach math, resulting in real world math that is “figure-out-able” for anyone.
Content provided by hand2mind
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Reading & Literacy Webinar
Science of Reading: Emphasis on Language Comprehension
Dive into language comprehension through a breakdown of the Science of Reading with an interactive demonstration.
Content provided by Be GLAD

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Federal Lawmakers Want to Reauthorize a Major Education Research Law. What Stands in the Way?
Lawmakers have tried and failed to reauthorize the Education Sciences Reform Act over the past nearly two decades.
7 min read
Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., left, joins Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee Chairman Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., left, as Starbucks founder Howard Schultz answers questions about the company's actions during an ongoing employee unionizing campaign, at the Capitol in Washington, on March 29, 2023.
Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., left, joins Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee Chairman Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., left, at the Capitol in Washington, on March 29, 2023. The two lawmakers sponsored a bill to reauthorize the Education Sciences Reform Act.
J. Scott Applewhite/AP
Federal Will the Government Actually Shut Down This Time? What Educators Should Know
The federal government is once again on the verge of shutting down. Here's why educators should care, but shouldn't necessarily worry.
1 min read
Photo illustration of Capitol building and closed sign.
iStock
Federal Biden Admin. Warns Schools to Protect Students From Antisemitism, Islamophobia
The U.S. Department of Education released a "Dear Colleague" letter reminding schools of their obligation to address discrimination.
3 min read
Education Secretary Miguel Cardona speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in his office at the Department of Education on Sept. 20, 2023 in Washington.
Education Secretary Miguel Cardona speaks during an interview in his office at the U.S. Department of Education on Sept. 20, 2023 in Washington.
Mark Schiefelbein/AP
Federal What Educators Should Know About Mike Johnson, New Speaker of the House
Johnson has supported restructuring federal education funding, as well as socially conservative policies that have become GOP priorities.
4 min read
House Speaker-elect Rep. Mike Johnson, R-La., addresses members of Congress at the Capitol in Washington on Oct. 25, 2023. Republicans eagerly elected Johnson as House speaker on Wednesday, elevating a deeply conservative but lesser-known leader to the seat of U.S. power and ending for now the political chaos in their majority.
House Speaker Mike Johnson, R-La., addresses members of Congress at the Capitol in Washington on Oct. 25, 2023. Johnson has a supported a number of conservative Republican education priorities in his time in Congress.
J. Scott Applewhite/AP