Law & Courts News in Brief

NYC Can Share Teacher Ratings

By The Associated Press — August 29, 2011 1 min read
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A state appeals court has affirmed a ruling that New York City can release performance ratings for 12,000 teachers. The United Federation of Teachers sued to block the release, arguing that it would invade teachers’ privacy. The union said it would appeal.

A version of this article appeared in the August 31, 2011 edition of Education Week as N.Y.C. Can Share Teacher Ratings

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