States

New Funding Formula in N.J. Faces Hurdles

Governor notes plan’s passage in annual speech to lawmakers.
By Catherine Gewertz — January 10, 2008 3 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Includes updates and/or revisions.

New Jersey lawmakers approved a new school funding formula Jan. 7 that would give more money to needy districts outside the state’s large cities, a milestone that Gov. Jon Corzine noted in his State of the State speech a day later.

The school funding plan, a cornerstone of the Democratic governor’s education agenda, cleared the legislature on the last day of its 2006-07 legislative session, only hours before the 2008-09 session was to begin.

But the spending formula still faces significant hurdles, including passing muster with the state supreme court, which has been overseeing how the state spends education money in its poorest urban districts as part of a long-running legal case.

Addressing both houses of the legislature on Jan. 8, the first day of the new legislative session, Mr. Corzine commended lawmakers for approving the plan. When he outlined it on Nov. 30, he had urged them to approve it before the 2006-07 session ended. (“N.J. Governor Seeks to Overhaul School Financing,” Dec. 12, 2007.)

“This new formula will improve all of our schools,” he said in his State of the State address to the new legislature. “It will help unify our citizens. And it will demonstrate to the public that government can work to provide for the common good.”

Some observers doubted that the school finance proposal could be adopted on such a tight timeline, and critics of the plan feared the accelerated schedule could cheat substantive consideration of a complex subject. But ultimately it passed 41-36 in the Assembly, the lower house, and 21-8 in the Senate.

A Senate stalemate over the vote was broken, and a majority of votes obtained, by the governor’s promise to add $20 million in special education funding to the fiscal 2009 budget. Some districts are concerned about the impact of a part of the plan that shifts a greater share of special education costs to districts that can afford to pay more.

All six African-American Democratic senators opposed the plan, fearing that poor districts they represent could lose aid and be forced to cut programs. Fellow Democrats who sought to get the plan passed had to turn to Republicans for support to break the stalemate.

Gov. Corzine’s plan eliminates the special-needs-district designation set up under the Abbott v. Burke finance case, which won a guarantee of funding levels for the poorest urban districts equal to those of the state’s richest districts. Instead, one formula would be applied the same way in all 616 of the state’s school districts. A base amount would be set for each student and adjusted for needs such as poverty and a district’s tax base.

Key Steps Remain

The funding plan would provide $7.8 billion in precollegiate spending in fiscal 2009, an increase of $532 million, or 7 percent. It would guarantee districts hikes of 2 percent to 20 percent and shift greater shares of aid to suburban districts that have large proportions of disadvantaged children. Most of the 31 so-called Abbott districts would get the minimum 2 percent increase.

Even with legislative approval, the new funding formula’s implementation is hardly a given.

The state attorney general issued an opinion Jan. 4 that the plan met constitutional requirements to provide the state’s children with a “thorough and efficient” education. But it still must get the approval of the New Jersey Supreme Court, which presides over the Abbott case.

Lawmakers also will have to grapple with where to get the money for the planned increase. The state, with a fiscal 2008 budget of $33.5 billion, projects a $3 billion shortfall in fiscal 2009. Its accumulated debts run so deep that Gov. Corzine, a former finance executive, made rebuilding the state’s fiscal health the sole focus of his State of the State speech.

He told lawmakers he will propose legislation to freeze overall state spending at this year’s level and ensure that future years’ spending cannot outstrip recurring revenue growth. To help pay down debt, he is proposing a 50 percent increase in highway tolls in 2010, and three identical hikes in the following 12 years.

The New Jersey School Boards Association ultimately backed the governor’s school funding method, since it marked the first increase for schools after six years of flat funding. But its leaders said the group would continue to press for changes to aspects that it opposes, such as a requirement that some districts deflect a portion of their aid hikes to their municipalities for property-tax relief if the state deems them to be spending above its established “adequacy level.”

A version of this article appeared in the January 16, 2008 edition of Education Week

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Attend to the Whole Child: Non-Academic Factors within MTSS
Learn strategies for proactively identifying and addressing non-academic barriers to student success within an MTSS framework.
Content provided by Renaissance
Classroom Technology K-12 Essentials Forum How to Teach Digital & Media Literacy in the Age of AI
Join this free event to dig into crucial questions about how to help students build a foundation of digital literacy.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

States Why This State Will Take a Class Requirement Off the Ballot—And Why It Matters
Asking voters to decide on a curriculum issue could set a tricky precedent, experts say.
2 min read
Image of books, money, calculator, and graduation cap.
cnythzl/DigitalVision Vectors
States How States Are Testing the Church-State Divide in Public Schools
A new order to teach the Bible in Oklahoma is the latest action to fuel debate over the presence of religion in schools.
7 min read
Image of a bible sitting on top of a school backpack.
Canva
States Lawsuit Challenges Louisiana's New Ten Commandments Law
Opponents argue that the law is a violation of separation of church and state and will isolate students.
3 min read
A copy of the Ten Commandments is posted along with other historical documents in a hallway of the Georgia Capitol, Thursday, June 20, 2024, in Atlanta. Civil liberties groups filed a lawsuit Monday, June 24, challenging Louisiana’s new law that requires the Ten Commandments to be displayed in every public school classroom.
A copy of the Ten Commandments is posted along with other historical documents in a hallway of the Georgia Capitol, Thursday, June 20, 2024, in Atlanta. Civil liberties groups filed a lawsuit Monday, June 24, challenging Louisiana’s new law that requires the Ten Commandments to be displayed in every public school classroom.
John Bazemore/AP
States The Surprising Contenders for State Superintendent Offices This Year
Two elections for the top education leadership job feature candidates who have never worked in public schools.
8 min read
North Dakota Superintendent of Public Instruction Kirsten Baesler announces the gathering of a task force to look into future options the state has for the assessment of students during a press conference May 8, 2015, at the state Capitol in Bismarck, N.D.
North Dakota Superintendent of Public Instruction Kirsten Baesler announces the gathering of a task force to look into future options for student assessment during a press conference May 8, 2015, in Bismarck, N.D. Baesler, the nation's longest-serving state schools chief, is running for a fourth term, facing opponents with no experience serving in public schools.
Mike McCleary/The Bismarck Tribune via AP