States

Legislative Update

February 28, 2001 2 min read
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The following is a summary of governors’ education proposals for fiscal 2002. The figures for the state budget and for precollegiate education spending include money for state education administration, but not federal, flow-through dollars. Percentage increases are based on rounded numbers, and estimated enrollment reflects the state’s projected public school enrollment for 2001-02, unless otherwise noted. Depending on the state, figures may or may not include prekindergarten spending and enrollment.


Connecticut

Governor: John G. Rowland (R)

Proposed FY 2002 state budget: $12.9 billion

Proposed FY 2002 pre-K-12 budget: $1.92 billion

FY 2001 pre-K-12 budget: $1.84 billion

Proposed percent change pre-K-12 budget: +4.3 percent

Estimated pre-K-12 enrollment: 569,540

Highlights:

  • Mr. Rowland recommends setting aside $10 million for five-year demonstration program that offers voucher-like scholarships that students in low-income districts could use to pay for tuition at private or religious schools, or to attend another public school.

Gov. John G. Rowland

  • Proposed budget would add about $14 million over next two fiscal years to $52.6 million in state aid allocated in current biennium to magnet schools. Added appropriation would increase total enrollment at such schools statewide from about 6,400 now to 11,500 in two years.
  • To offset effects of legislated cap on annual increases in state funding for school districts, governor proposes using $25 million in each of next two years from a fund established to provide general aid to municipalities.

Louisiana

Governor: Mike Foster (R)

Proposed FY 2002 state budget:$9.60 billion

Proposed FY 2002 K-12 budget: $2.59 billion

FY 2001 K-12 budget: $2.42 billion

Proposed percent change K-12 budget: +7.0 percent

Estimated K-12 enrollment: 748,000*

Highlights:

Gov. Mike Foster

  • Under governor’s plan, $140 million would go toward increasing teacher pay. Half of that proposed amount would be contingent on lawmakers’ raising taxes on riverboat casinos in a special session next month; other half would require state school board’s approval for allowing a portion of automatic growth in school funding formula to be used for that purpose. Louisiana voters rejected ballot initiative last fall that would have restructured state tax system and provided more money for teacher pay.
  • Governor wants to put $26 million in new money into state’s school accountability program, much of it for remedial instruction for students who fail state’s high-stakes tests. Some of aid would pay for financial and other rewards for schools that excelled.
  • Budget proposes to hold steady funding for certain areas, such as states’s K-3 reading and mathematics initiative, which received $14.3 million this fiscal year.

Michigan

Governor: John Engler (R)

Proposed FY 2002 state budget: $28.1 billion

Proposed FY 2002 pre-K-12 budget: $11.42 billion

FY 2001 pre-K-12 budget: $10.83 billion

Proposed percent change pre-K-12 budget: +5.4 percent

Estimated pre-K-12 enrollment: 1.73 million

Highlights:

  • Three-year school aid budget enacted last year guarantees minimum of $6,500 per pupil each year though fiscal 2003.

  • Multiyear budget includes just under $300 million in fiscal 2002 for early-childhood initiatives and other programs aimed at helping children succeed in primary school years.

  • About $10 million has been earmarked for awards to pay for school improvement efforts in elementary schools that have posted rapid gains in student performance.

* Denotes enrollment for 2000-01.

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A version of this article appeared in the February 28, 2001 edition of Education Week as Legislative Update

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