States

Legislative Update

January 17, 2001 5 min read
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The following is a summary of governors’ education proposals for fiscal 2002. The figures for the state budget and for precollegiate education spending include money for state education administration, but not federal, flow-through dollars. Percentage increases are based on rounded numbers, and estimated enrollment reflects the state’s projected public school enrollment for 2001-02, unless otherwise noted. Depending on the state, figures may or may not include prekindergarten spending and enrollment.


Arizona | California | Kansas | Montana | New Mexico | South Dakota | Utah

ARIZONA

Governor: Jane D. Hull (R)

Proposed FY 2002 state budget: $9.87 billion

Proposed FY 2002 K-12 budget: $3.27 billion

FY 2001 K-12 budget: $2.92 billion

Proposed percent change K-12 budget: +12 percent

Estimated K-12 enrollment:881,000

Highlights:

  • Budget figures above include some $660 million expected to be generated over next two fiscal years by sales-tax increase approved by voters in November, including nearly $311 million in fiscal 2002.
  • Biennial state budget of $19.7 billion calls for $6.2 billion in legislatively appropriated aid for K-12 education in fiscal 2002 and 2003. That figure does not include money from sales-tax increase.
  • Addition of $2.2 million in fiscal 2002 for changes in state’s testing program, including elimination of Stanford Achievement Test-9th Edition for grades 10 and 11, and changes in state’s Arizona Instrument to Measure Standards test.

CALIFORNIA

Governor: Gov. Gray Davis (D)

Proposed FY 2002 state budget: $104.7 billion

Proposed FY 2002 K-12 budget: $33.46 billion

FY 2001 K-12 budget: $32.94 billion

Percent change K-12 budget: +1.6 percent

Estimated K-12 enrollment: 5.75 million

Highlights:

  • Proposed budget would increase per-pupil spending by more than 4 percent, from $6,895 in fiscal 2001, to $7,174 in fiscal 2002. Overall K-12 spending increase is smaller, however, in part because governor is proposing less state aid for school construction, a change not reflected in the per-pupil figure.
  • Plan includes $100 million to finance first year of a $1.45 billion three-year plan to lengthen school year for middle school students by six weeks.
  • Budget allots $335 million for standards-based professional development for mathematics and English/language arts teachers, and $15 million for leadership training for school administrators.
  • Governor earmarks $30 million for new incentive payments to improve algebra instruction.

KANSAS

Governor: Bill Graves (R)

Proposed FY 2002 state budget: $4.66 billion

Proposed FY 2002 pre-K-12 budget: $2.33 billion

FY 2001 pre-K-12 budget: $2.26 billion

Proposed percent change pre-K-12 budget: +3 percent

Estimated pre-K-12 enrollment: 577,000

Highlights:

  • Governor proposes increasing per-pupil funding from $3,820 in fiscal year 2001 to $3,870 in fiscal 2002 to account for inflation.
  • He also asked lawmakers to boost state’s share of funding for special education from $233 million in fiscal 2001 to $252 million in fiscal 2002. Most would be spent on teacher salaries.
  • Mr. Graves recommends increasing spending for state’s preschool program for 4-year-olds at risk of school failure from $4.9 million in fiscal 2001, to $5.9 million in fiscal 2002 to accommodate more children. Plan would allow state to add about 430 more children to some 2,200 poor children served this year.

MONTANA

Governor: Judy Martz (R)

Proposed FY 2002 state budget: $1.2 billion

Proposed FY 2002 K-12 budget: $490.03 million

FY 2001 K-12 budget: $508.61 million

Proposed percent change K-12 budget: -3.6 percent

Estimated K-12 enrollment: 155,000 students

Highlights:

  • Funding for public education in proposed biennial budget is less than previous biennium due to drops in state revenue and enrollment.
  • Gov. Martz proposes total of $1 million over two years for school improvement, including implementing standards and testing.
  • Governor earmarks total of $120,000 for biennium to help incorporate information about American Indians into state standards and improve communication between American Indian community and educators.
  • Budget includes plan to start loan-forgiveness program for teachers in rural areas.

NEW MEXICO

Governor: Gary E. Johnson (R)

Proposed FY 2002 state budget: $3.8 billion

Proposed FY 2002 pre-K-12 budget: $1.79 billion

FY 2001 pre-K-12 budget: $1.70 billion

Percent change pre-K-12 budget: +5.3 percent

Estimated K-12 enrollment: 317,000 Highlights:

  • Gov. Johnson proposes to draw on $415 million surplus, created largely by oil and gas revenues, to finance a $75 million income-tax cut and a $24 million private-school-voucher program that would provide poor students with tuition vouchers averaging $5,200.
  • Governor’s budget proposal would set aside $41 million for teacher pay raises of 5 percent, based on merit.
  • Another $17 million would be used to accelerate pace of implementing full-day kindergarten, which was begun with $8.5 million last year. Additional $2.8 million would be provided for schools to expand facilities to accommodate full-day programs.

SOUTH DAKOTA

Governor: William J. Janklow (R)

Proposed FY 2002 state budget: $1.48 billion

Proposed FY 2002 K-12 budget: $314.02 million

FY 2001 K-12 budget: $289.93 million

Proposed percent change K-12 budget: +8.3 percent

Estimated K-12 enrollment: 132,000

Highlights:

  • Governor proposes special, one-time appropriation of $1 million to expand existing $1 million reading initiative to train teachers in 1st through 3rd grades.
  • Proposed spending plan includes a 3 percent increase in state aid to school districts, from $3,666 to $3,776 per student.
  • Budget also provides $10.2 million in additional state aid to enable local districts to reduce property taxes for schools.

UTAH

Governor: Michael O. Leavitt (R)

Proposed FY 2002 state budget: $7.26 billion

Proposed FY 2002 K-12 budget: $1.86 billion

FY 2001 K-12 budget: $1.63 billion

Proposed percent change K-12 budget: +14.1 percent

Estimated K-12 enrollment: 476,000

Highlights:

  • While budget includes a 6 percent increase in weighted amount state provides per pupil, governor calls for re-examining state funding formula to make it simpler and more flexible.
  • K-12 budget figures include money from state’s general fund and dedicated school fund, as well as special one-time spending measures proposed by governor for coming fiscal year.
  • Budget proposes $50 million in block grants to help districts lower class sizes and pay for other priorities, and $45 million in one-time funding to update textbooks and library books and to reimburse teachers for supplies.
  • Governor proposes $19 million to recruit and retain secondary school teachers in mathematics, science, and information technology. Such teachers would receive incentive pay in return for agreeing to teach four years in public schools.
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A version of this article appeared in the January 17, 2001 edition of Education Week as Legislative Update

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