Federal

How Does Title I Aid Stack Up State to State?

By Andrew Ujifusa — April 30, 2019 1 min read
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But what about education spending statistics that are more firmly rooted in what Congress has done?

The U.S. Department of Education last month released funding tables for several major programs for each state, covering fiscal 2018, 2019, and 2020, including state-by-state grants under Title I. That’s the formula-grant program designed to serve disadvantaged students and the single largest pot of money for K-12 in the federal budget.

Despite the Trump administration’s attempts to cut the federal budget for fiscal 2018 and 2019, Congress has given small increases to the Education Department’s budget for each of those years. That trend includes Title I, which is now getting $15.9 billion, compared with $15.5 billion in fiscal 2017. (Trump signed his first spending bills into law for fiscal 2018.)

However, just because total Title I aid has risen doesn’t mean each state is getting more cash. The estimates indicate that 18 states will get less in money for disadvantaged students in fiscal 2019 (which covers the 2019-20 school year) than in the current year. Those states include California (which gets the biggest amount of Title I by far), Colorado, Indiana, Oregon, and Wisconsin.

Important caveat: The numbers for fiscal 2019 are estimates based on the spending bill signed by Trump last September and aren’t finalized. Because they’re based on legislation passed by Congress, however, most if not all the numbers are probably a good indication of where Title I funding is headed for each state.

The tables also includes state-by-state Title I estimates for fiscal 2020, though Congress has yet to pass spending legislation for that fiscal year, which begins Oct. 1.

Here’s the complete list for all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

BRIC ARCHIVE

A version of this article appeared in the May 01, 2019 edition of Education Week as How Does Title I Aid Stack Up State to State?

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