Education Funding

‘Global Action Week’ Puts Spotlight On Education of Poor

By Rhea R. Borja — April 24, 2002 2 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

From Bangladesh to Uruguay, a global grassroots effort to make public education more accessible in poor countries is scheduled to kick off this week with rallies and other awareness activities, as well as letters to government officials around the world.

More information on Global Action week is available from the Campaign for Global Education.

During what is being billed as Global Action Week, almost 12 million educators in more than 65 countries plan to pressure their governments to draft national education plans, increase education aid, and end school fees, says the Global Campaign for Education, the umbrella group for the effort. The GCE is a coalition of trade unions, development agencies, and education community groups based in Brussels, Belgium.

Scheduled activities include a children’s press conference with the deputy education minister in Bangladesh, and meetings with education officials as well as the creation of radio and television spots in Senegal. And information about the campaign will be posted on the Web site of the National Education Association, the largest U.S. teachers’ union.

Educators and activists are also e-mailing postcards and petitions to politicians and leaders of the “Group of Eight” countries that confer on economic issues, including President Bush and Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chrétien.

‘How We Prioritize’

It’s the responsibility of rich nations such as the United States to help make free public education a reality worldwide, argued Jill Christianson, a senior professional associate in the international-relations office of the NEA. The NEA and the American Federation of Teachers are two of the nearly 100 organizations participating in the campaign.

“It’s a question of how we prioritize, and a sound education is a component of stable futures for children and societies,” Ms. Christianson said.

Ending school fees would be another step toward making public education accessible, organizers of the campaign say. Those costs, charged for schooling in many countries, often deter poor families from seeking an education for their children, especially girls.

An estimated one-fifth of the elementary- age children worldwide—approximately 125 million—are not attending school, according to Education International, a 24.5 million-member federation of teacher unions based in Brussels and a campaign participant. An overwhelming two-thirds of them are girls.

The future doesn’t look any better, campaign supporters say, despite an agreement made two years ago by 180 governments, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, and the World Bank to achieve free primary education by 2015 and gender equity by 2005 for the world’s children.

Those goals, set at the World Education Forum in Dakar, Senegal, will likely be missed by 88 governments, and many haven’t even developed plans for them yet, according to the Global Campaign for Education.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the April 24, 2002 edition of Education Week as ‘Global Action Week’ Puts Spotlight On Education of Poor

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
IT Infrastructure & Management Webinar
Future-Proofing Your School's Tech Ecosystem: Strategies for Asset Tracking, Sustainability, and Budget Optimization
Gain actionable insights into effective asset management, budget optimization, and sustainable IT practices.
Content provided by Follett Learning
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Budget & Finance Webinar
Innovative Funding Models: A Deep Dive into Public-Private Partnerships
Discover how innovative funding models drive educational projects forward. Join us for insights into effective PPP implementation.
Content provided by Follett Learning
Budget & Finance Webinar Staffing Schools After ESSER: What School and District Leaders Need to Know
Join our newsroom for insights on investing in critical student support positions as pandemic funds expire.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Funding When There's More Money for Schools, Is There an 'Objective' Way to Hand It Out?
A fight over the school funding formula in Mississippi is kicking up old debates over how to best target aid.
7 min read
Illustration of many roads and road signs going in different directions with falling money all around.
iStock/Getty
Education Funding Explainer How Can Districts Get More Time to Spend ESSER Dollars? An Explainer
Districts can get up to 14 additional months to spend ESSER dollars on contracts—if their state and the federal government both approve.
4 min read
Illustration of woman turning back hands on clock.
Education Week + iStock / Getty Images Plus Week
Education Funding Education Dept. Sees Small Cut in Funding Package That Averted Government Shutdown
The Education Department will see a reduction even as the funding package provides for small increases to key K-12 programs.
3 min read
President Joe Biden delivers a speech about healthcare at an event in Raleigh, N.C., on March 26, 2024.
President Joe Biden delivers a speech about health care at an event in Raleigh, N.C., on March 26. Biden signed a funding package into law over the weekend that keeps the federal government open through September but includes a slight decrease in the Education Department's budget.
Matt Kelley/AP
Education Funding Biden's Budget Proposes Smaller Bump to Education Spending
The president requested increases to Title I and IDEA, and funding to expand preschool access in his 2025 budget proposal.
7 min read
President Joe Biden delivers remarks on lowering prices for American families during an event at the YMCA Allard Center on March 11, 2024, in Goffstown, N.H.
President Joe Biden delivers remarks on lowering prices for American families during an event at the YMCA Allard Center on March 11, 2024, in Goffstown, N.H. Biden's administration released its 2025 budget proposal, which includes a modest spending increase for the Education Department.
Evan Vucci/AP