Education Funding Report Roundup

GAO: More Help Needed for RTT Winners

By Alyson Klein — April 21, 2015 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

The Race to the Top grant initiative is unlikely to be included in the next federal K-12 education law, but a study by the Government Accountability Office suggests the U.S. Department of Education should give states more support in implementing any future competitive-grant programs.

Race to the Top, which winds down in September after six years, offered $4 billion in grants to states that were willing to embrace education priorities such as school turnarounds, teacher evaluation through student outcomes, rigorous standards and assessments, and comprehensive state data systems.

The GAO found that the Education Department did not provide enough technical assistance, particularly to rural districts, which have had a difficult time sustaining changes under the grants. Both rural and urban districts reported financial stability as one of the most challenging parts of continuing changes in assessment and student data. But rural district leaders were more than twice as likely as urban leaders to say they faced significant challenges in organization and human capital in working to improve standards and assessments.

The GAO calls for the department to provide more individualized help to states, allow more collaboration among grantees, provide professional development to state officials throughout the grant process, and help grantees find good contractors.

BRIC ARCHIVE

A version of this article appeared in the April 22, 2015 edition of Education Week as GAO: More Help Needed for RTT Winners

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Law & Courts Webinar
Future of the First Amendment:Exploring Trends in High School Students’ Views of Free Speech
Learn how educators are navigating student free speech issues and addressing controversial topics like gender and race in the classroom.
Content provided by The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Start Strong With Solid SEL Implementation: Success Strategies for the New School Year
Join Satchel Pulse to learn why implementing a solid SEL program at the beginning of the year will deliver maximum impact to your students.
Content provided by Satchel Pulse
Jobs Virtual Career Fair for Teachers and K-12 Staff
Find teaching jobs and other jobs in K-12 education at the EdWeek Top School Jobs virtual career fair.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Funding What America Spends on K-12: The Latest Federal Snapshot
About 93 percent of K-12 spending came from state and local sources in 2019-20—but more-recent year totals will reflect federal relief aid.
2 min read
Education Funding Opinion How You Can Avoid Missing Out on COVID Relief Money
We’re losing the race against the clock to spend ESSER funds, but there are solutions.
Erin Covington
3 min read
Illustration of cash dangling from line and hand trying to grasp it.
F.Sheehan/Education Week (Images: Getty)
Education Funding K-12 Infrastructure Is Broken. Here's Biden's Newest Plan to Help Fix It
School districts will, among other things, be able to apply for $500 million in U.S. Department of Energy grants for HVAC improvements.
2 min read
Image of an excavator in front of a school building.
iStock/Getty
Education Funding Less Funding, Less Representation: What a Historic Undercount of Latinos Means for Schools
Experts point to wide-ranging implications, including how much federal funding schools with large Latino populations will get.
3 min read
Classroom with Latino boy.
Prostock-Studio/Getty