Education Funding

Fonda Gives Harvard Ed. School $12 Million

By Marianne D. Hurst — March 07, 2001 2 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Jane Fonda has donated $12.5 million for the establishment of an interdisciplinary research center at Harvard University’s graduate school of education—the largest personal donation the school has ever received.

The Harvard Center on Gender and Education will specialize in exploring the effect that gender has on the learning and development of children.

“It will be built on the great work that’s already going on here at the school,” Jerome T. Murphy, the dean of the graduate school, said of the gift from the actress. “Jane Fonda’s generous commitment offers Harvard an incomparable opportunity to examine, both domestically and globally, the issues that affect how boys and girls learn, and to develop ways to strengthen their resilience and academic growth.”

The center’s initial goals will be to sponsor research, devise teaching strategies and practices, and help educators address gender issues within schools and communities, Mr. Murphy said.

“There are no real limitations on what the center can do,” added Christine Sanni, a spokeswoman for the graduate school. “It will draw from almost every academic aspect of the university. This means, for example, that the medical school might apply for gender research that involves the treatment of boys with [attention deficit disorder]. “

“Jane Fonda did make one thing very clear,” Ms. Sanni said. “She didn’t want the program to become a white, ivory-tower think tank. The program is, therefore, designed to influence actual practices and assist students.”

Chair Endowed

Ms. Fonda, who has worked on behalf of teenage-pregnancy-prevention efforts in Atlanta, initiated the project last spring when she spoke at the university about the challenges faced by young women in education and the widespread efforts made to give women equal access to education abroad.

She challenged Mr. Murphy to build a research base at the university and offered to underwrite the project. “I recognized the need to bring some of these lessons home,” Ms. Fonda said last week in a statement. “We still have a culture that teaches girls and boys a distorted view of what it takes to be women and men.”

Though Ms. Fonda had no formal affiliation with the university, she chose to donate money to the school in part because she was inspired by the work of the psychologist Carol Gilligan, a member of the graduate school faculty who has conducted extensive research on gender issues. Ms. Gilligan will help in the formation of the center.

To honor Ms. Gilligan’s work, $2.5 million will go toward the creation of an endowed faculty chair in her name and an administrative support staff, according to Mr. Murphy.

A version of this article appeared in the March 07, 2001 edition of Education Week as Fonda Gives Harvard Ed. School $12 Million

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Recruitment & Retention Webinar
Be the Change: Strategies to Make Year-Round Hiring Happen
Learn how to leverage actionable insights to diversify your recruiting efforts and successfully deploy a year-round recruiting plan.
Content provided by Frontline
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Equity & Diversity Webinar
Critical Ways Leaders Can Build a Culture of Belonging and Achievement
Explore innovative practices for using technology to build an environment of belonging and achievement for all staff and students.
Content provided by DreamBox Learning
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Professional Development Webinar
Strategies for Improving Student Outcomes with Teacher-Student Relationships
Explore strategies for strengthening teacher-student relationships and hear how districts are putting these methods into practice to support positive student outcomes.
Content provided by Panorama Education

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Funding In Their Own Words This Superintendent's Tiny, Rural District Got No COVID Aid. Here's Why That Hurts
The aid formula left Long Lake, N.Y., out of the mix. The superintendent worries that could happen for other kinds of aid in the future.
3 min read
Long Lake Superintendent Noelle Short in front of Long Lake Central School in Long Lake, N.Y., on Sept. 1, 2022.
Noelle Short is the superintendent of a single-school district in upstate New York with fewer than 100 students.
Heather Ainsworth for Education Week
Education Funding Grants Aim to Support Alaska Native Students' Education, Well-Being
The U.S. Department of Education is providing more than $35 million for projects in its latest round of funding.
2 min read
The East Anchorage High and Scammon Bay students gather at a home in the Native Village to learn how to comb fur from a musk ox hide using special combs and common forks. The fur can later be spun into yarn.
Students from East Anchorage High School and Scammon Bay, Alaska, gather to learn how to comb fur from a musk ox hide through a federally funded cultural and educational program for Alaska Native students.
Erin Irwin/Education Week
Education Funding District Leaders Plea to Feds: We Need More Time to Spend COVID Aid
Without more flexibility on the 2024 spending deadline, critical programs will be axed, they warn.
5 min read
Image of money and a timer.
iStock/Getty
Education Funding Biden Administration Outlines How School Districts Should Spend COVID Aid
White House back-to-school checklist encourages school districts to involve parents in spending decisions.
5 min read
Angela Pike watches her fourth grade students at Lakewood Elementary School in Cecilia, Ky., as they use their laptops to participate in an emotional check-in at the start of the school day, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2022. The rural Kentucky school is one of thousands across the country using the technology to screen students' state of mind and alert teachers to anyone struggling.
Angela Pike watches her 4th-grade students at Lakewood Elementary School in Cecilia, Ky., as they use their laptops on Aug. 11 to participate in an emotional check-in at the start of the school day. The Biden administration recommended that schools use COVID-19 relief funds to support student mental health.
Timothy D. Easley/AP