Education Funding

Federal History-Grant Program Takes Budget Hit for Fiscal 2011

April 19, 2011 2 min read
A statue of Abraham Lincoln when he was nine years-old sits in front of Lincoln's boyhood home in Indiana, in this scene at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum in Springfield, Ill. The complex houses one of the world's largest collections of Lincoln documents and artifacts, from letters he wrote as a young lawyer to an original copy of the Gettysburg Address.

Just days before the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War, Congress and the White House struck an overdue budget agreement that deals a blow to a federal program favored by many advocates for improved history instruction.

Under the plan, funding for the Teaching American History grants program, which has supplied more than $1 billion over the past decade for school districts and their nonprofit partners, is being reduced from $119 million in fiscal 2010 to $46 million in the current year.

The House and the Senate approved the measure late last week, and President Barack Obama was expected to sign it into law.

Although supporters of the program said they were disappointed by the reduction, some expressed relief that it was still funded at all, given the growing appetite among Republicans and Democrats alike for federal budget cuts. If the program had been zeroed out, analysts say, it likely would have faced a tough time getting reinstated.

Launched in 2001, the program supports a range of professional-development initiatives around the country to build teachers’ knowledge and understanding of U.S. history, as well as their appreciation for it. A central goal, according to the U.S. Department of Education, is “to demonstrate how school districts and institutions with expertise in American history can collaborate ... to ensure that teachers develop the knowledge and skills necessary to teach traditional American history in an exciting and engaging way.”

‘Reshape, Reinvigorate’

A New Generation of Museums

A variety of Civil War museums have opened in recent years, exploring such issues as medical innovations, the experiences of African-American soldiers, and the Underground Railroad.

SOURCE: Education Week

A variety of history educators give the program high marks, saying it’s been influential in improving instruction.

“It’s been huge,” said James M. Percoco, a history teacher at West Springfield High School in Springfield, Va. With grant funding, he has been hired to instruct teachers in the use of primary-source documents and of monuments during summer institutes, in some cases focused on the Civil War. (“Primary Sources Breathe Life Into Civil War,” April 20, 2011.)

The program has helped to “reshape and reinvigorate the teaching of history,” he said.

But a federal evaluation in 2005 offered a mixed review of the program. For example, it said the projects examined showed “some, but not all, of the research-based characteristics of effective professional development.”

The Pry House Field Hospital Mueseum, operated by the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in in Sharpsburg, Md., gives visitors to nearby Antietam National Battlefield a view of the lifesaving medical techniques that were pioneered during the Civil War.

Also, while the work products, such as lesson plans and research papers, teachers produced as part of their participation demonstrated “a firm grasp of historical facts, ... they had difficulty interpreting and analyzing historical information.”

In any case, Kimberley Warrick, a curriculum specialist for a group of districts in Georgia, said her past participation as a Montana teacher in programs supported by the Teaching American History grants was transformative.

“It absolutely changed the way I taught history,” she said. The programs encouraged her to dive down more deeply into topics, and make better, and more frequent, use of primary sources. “I was missing how to hook [students]. After being a participant, I knew what I needed to hook them.”

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A version of this article appeared in the April 20, 2011 edition of Education Week as Federal History-Grant Program Takes Budget Hit for Fiscal 2011

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