History

Education news, analysis, and opinion about how history is taught

Explainer

Who Decides What History We Teach? An Explainer
Education Week breaks down how politics has long been embedded in this decision, and how new laws may affect the process.
Collage of an American Flag.
Collage: Laura Baker/Education Week (Images: iStock/Getty)
Reading & Literacy Creator of 1619 Project Launching After-School Literacy Program
The 1619 Freedom School, led by journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones, will make its curriculum a free online resource in 2022.
Ileana Najarro, September 7, 2021
4 min read
A Native American man sees a vibrant history emerging from a book.
"Tells His Story" by Brent Greenwood for Education Week
Social Studies Opinion Why Do Native People Disappear From Textbooks After the 1890s?
How we teach American history has direct consequences for Native students today, writes a Navajo Technical University professor.
Joshua Ward Jeffery, August 16, 2021
5 min read
Education secretary nominee Miguel Cardona speaks during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on his nomination on Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Education secretary nominee Miguel Cardona speaks during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on his nomination on Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times via AP
Federal Fact Check: After Furor Over 1619 Project, Feds Adjust History and Civics Grant Plans
A previously obscure history and civics program has weathered a political storm, but what exactly has changed?
Andrew Ujifusa, July 19, 2021
4 min read
crt texas teachers uncertainty
iStock/Getty Images
Teaching Teachers Share What They Will—and Won't—Do Differently Under Critical Race Theory Law
Seven Texas teachers discuss the ways their classrooms will be affected by a state law restricting how they talk about race and racism with students.
8 min read
070921 AAPI Bill Illinois AP BS
Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker answers questions during a news conference at the Illinois State Capitol on May 22, 2020, in Springfield, Ill.
Justin L. Fowler/The State Journal-Register via AP
Social Studies Illinois Becomes First State to Require Teaching Asian American History in Public Schools
The law is the latest in a series of new requirements the governor has signed that aim to make the teaching of history more inclusive.
Dan Petrella, Chicago Tribune, July 9, 2021
3 min read
Illustration.
Kubkoo/iStock/Getty
Standards Social Studies Standards Spark Fierce Debate in N.C.
Advocates say the new standards are more inclusive because they give more attention to the perspectives of historically marginalized groups.
T. Keung Hui, The News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.), July 8, 2021
6 min read
Images shows colorful speech bubbles that say "Q," "&," and "A."
iStock/Getty
Teaching Opinion When It Comes to Critical Race Theory, Teachers 'Should Go on Offense With Inquiry'
Four educators respond to conservative attacks on critical race theory and lessons on systemic racism.
Larry Ferlazzo, June 29, 2021
12 min read
Demonstrators march through downtown Orlando, Fla., during a Juneteenth event on June 19, 2020.
Demonstrators march through downtown Orlando, Fla., during a Juneteenth event on June 19, 2020.<br/>
John Raoux/AP
Social Studies Opinion Juneteenth Meets Anti-Critical Race Theory Laws: Where Do Teachers Go From Here?
No, talking to students about our history will not teach them to hate this country.
Jania Hoover , June 22, 2021
4 min read
Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., speaks during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on voting rights on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 20, 2021.
Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., speaks during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on voting rights on Capitol Hill.
Evelyn Hockstein/AP
Federal Republicans Want Federal Funding Cuts to Schools Using '1619 Project'—But There's a Twist
A bill from U.S. Sens. Tom Cotton, Mitch McConnell, and others targets schools using lessons based on the New York Times Magazine series.
Andrew Ujifusa, June 15, 2021
4 min read
A white mob destroyed thirty-five blocks of Black-owned businesses and homes in Tulsa's Greenwood District over two days in 1921. This photo shows district buildings in ruins after the race riots occurred.
A white mob destroyed thirty-five blocks of Black-owned businesses and homes in Tulsa's Greenwood District over two days in 1921. This photo shows district buildings in ruins after the race riots occurred.
Library of Congress
Social Studies 'A Conspiracy of Silence': Tulsa Race Massacre Was Absent From Schools for Generations
Many were well into adulthood when they learned Black Wall Street had existed in Tulsa and had been razed in a spree of white violence.
Nuria Martinez-Keel, The Oklahoman, May 26, 2021
8 min read
Illustrations.
Mary Hassdyk for Education Week
Equity & Diversity Efforts to Root Out Racism in Schools Would Unravel Under 'Critical Race Theory' Bills
The bills proposed in more than 15 states would force districts to end initiatives that acknowledge individual and systemic acts of racism.
Eesha Pendharkar, May 26, 2021
9 min read
Illustration of a cluster of faces.
Kubkoo/iStock/Getty
Social Studies 'Divisive' or 'Necessary'? Comments on Grant Priorities Show Divide on Teaching About Race
Thousands of comments on a history education grant proposal appear to have been submitted through a group that opposes "woke" education.
Evie Blad & Andrew Ujifusa, May 19, 2021
8 min read
Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona, right, talks to 12th grade art student Madri Mazo at White Plains High School in White Plains, N.Y. on April 22, 2021.
U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona, left, talks to 12th grade art student Eugene Coleman at White Plains High School in White Plains, N.Y. in April.
Mark Lennihan/AP
Education Funding Miguel Cardona's First Budget Hearing Becomes Forum on In-Person Learning, 1619 Project
In his first public testimony to Congress as education secretary, Cardona also touched on standardized testing and student discipline.
Andrew Ujifusa, May 5, 2021
6 min read
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., talks on Capitol Hill in Washington on April 20, 2021.
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., talks on Capitol Hill in Washington earlier this month.
J. Scott Applewhite/AP
Social Studies GOP Leader: Biden Grant Plan Referencing Anti-Racism, 1619 Project Is 'Divisive Nonsense'
Sen. Mitch McConnell's letter to the Education Dept. about a small history program amplifies a political scrum dating back to last year.
Andrew Ujifusa, April 30, 2021
3 min read