History

Education news, analysis, and opinion about how history is taught

Explainer

Who Decides What History We Teach? An Explainer
Education Week breaks down how politics has long been embedded in this decision, and how new laws may affect the process.
Illustration of tug of war.
Illustration by Laura Baker/Education Week, SvetaZi, and iStock/Getty
Social Studies Critical Race Theory and the Fight Over History Standards: 6 Things to Know
EdWeek examined how the backlash to classroom discussions on race has set back efforts to expand what students learn about American history.
Stephen Sawchuk, January 19, 2022
2 min read
Image of a social study book coming to visual life with edits to the content.
Illustration by Laura Baker/Education Week (Source imagery: Orensila and iStock/Getty)
Social Studies Revising America's Racist Past
How the 'critical race theory' debate is crashing headlong into efforts to update social studies standards.
Stephen Sawchuk, January 18, 2022
27 min read
Conceptual image of woman with lantern searching and walking through a fog between pages and books.
iStock/Getty Images Plus
Social Studies What's the History of Reconstruction? In Many States, Students Don't Get the Whole Picture
A new report finds that state standards muddy the significance of the era, omit key understandings, or promote false narratives.
Sarah Schwartz, January 12, 2022
8 min read
Supporters of President Donald Trump gather outside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.
Supporters of President Donald Trump gather outside the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.
Shafkat Anowar/AP
Social Studies Opinion My Students Still Have Questions About the Capitol Riot. They Deserve Honest Answers
Jan. 6, 2021, is a lesson plan for the difficult but critical U.S. history that often gets left out of textbooks, writes a history teacher.
Chris Dier, January 5, 2022
4 min read
Images shows colorful speech bubbles that say "Q," "&," and "A."
iStock/Getty
Social Studies Opinion Teaching About Slavery in the United States? Start With Honesty
Strategies have to include teachers acknowledging what they don't know and recognizing they have to convey some ugly truths.
Larry Ferlazzo, November 1, 2021
14 min read
Collage of an American Flag.
Collage: Laura Baker/Education Week (Images: iStock/Getty)
Reading & Literacy Creator of 1619 Project Launching After-School Literacy Program
The 1619 Freedom School, led by journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones, will make its curriculum a free online resource in 2022.
Ileana Najarro, September 7, 2021
4 min read
A Native American man sees a vibrant history emerging from a book.
"Tells His Story" by Brent Greenwood for Education Week
Social Studies Opinion Why Do Native People Disappear From Textbooks After the 1890s?
How we teach American history has direct consequences for Native students today, writes a Navajo Technical University professor.
Joshua Ward Jeffery, August 16, 2021
5 min read
Education secretary nominee Miguel Cardona speaks during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on his nomination on Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Education secretary nominee Miguel Cardona speaks during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on his nomination on Feb. 3, 2021, in Washington.
Anna Moneymaker/The New York Times via AP
Federal Fact Check: After Furor Over 1619 Project, Feds Adjust History and Civics Grant Plans
A previously obscure history and civics program has weathered a political storm, but what exactly has changed?
Andrew Ujifusa, July 19, 2021
4 min read
crt texas teachers uncertainty
iStock/Getty Images
Teaching Teachers Share What They Will—and Won't—Do Differently Under Critical Race Theory Law
Seven Texas teachers discuss the ways their classrooms will be affected by a state law restricting how they talk about race and racism with students.
8 min read
070921 AAPI Bill Illinois AP BS
Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker answers questions during a news conference at the Illinois State Capitol on May 22, 2020, in Springfield, Ill.
Justin L. Fowler/The State Journal-Register via AP
Social Studies Illinois Becomes First State to Require Teaching Asian American History in Public Schools
The law is the latest in a series of new requirements the governor has signed that aim to make the teaching of history more inclusive.
Dan Petrella, Chicago Tribune, July 9, 2021
3 min read
Illustration.
Kubkoo/iStock/Getty
Standards Social Studies Standards Spark Fierce Debate in N.C.
Advocates say the new standards are more inclusive because they give more attention to the perspectives of historically marginalized groups.
T. Keung Hui, The News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.), July 8, 2021
6 min read
Images shows colorful speech bubbles that say "Q," "&," and "A."
iStock/Getty
Teaching Opinion When It Comes to Critical Race Theory, Teachers 'Should Go on Offense With Inquiry'
Four educators respond to conservative attacks on critical race theory and lessons on systemic racism.
Larry Ferlazzo, June 29, 2021
12 min read
Demonstrators march through downtown Orlando, Fla., during a Juneteenth event on June 19, 2020.
Demonstrators march through downtown Orlando, Fla., during a Juneteenth event on June 19, 2020.<br/>
John Raoux/AP
Social Studies Opinion Juneteenth Meets Anti-Critical Race Theory Laws: Where Do Teachers Go From Here?
No, talking to students about our history will not teach them to hate this country.
Jania Hoover , June 22, 2021
4 min read
Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., speaks during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on voting rights on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 20, 2021.
Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., speaks during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on voting rights on Capitol Hill.
Evelyn Hockstein/AP
Federal Republicans Want Federal Funding Cuts to Schools Using '1619 Project'—But There's a Twist
A bill from U.S. Sens. Tom Cotton, Mitch McConnell, and others targets schools using lessons based on the New York Times Magazine series.
Andrew Ujifusa, June 15, 2021
4 min read