Education Funding

Ed. Dept. Official Grilled Over Tax, Conflict of Interest Allegations

By The Associated Press — February 09, 2016 2 min read
Danny Harris, the chief information officer for the U.S. Department of Education, testifies on Capitol Hill over an Inspector General’s report that looked into his personal business and tax issues.
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Lawmakers on the House Government and Oversight Committee are probing tax and conflict of interest allegations against the U.S. Department of Education’s chief information officer—and that could create headaches for acting U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr., who was called to testify in Congress on the issue last week.

Danny Harris, the department’s CIO, ran a side business installing home theaters and detailing cars, according to the Associated Press. He didn’t report about $10,000 in income from that business in public disclosure forms, or on his taxes. And he made a $4,000 loan to one of his subordinates and allegedly helped a relative get a job at the department, according to the Education Department’s Inspector General.

Harris was asked about those issues by lawmakers on the House oversight committee Feb. 2, and after the hearing concluded, he collapsed and was taken to the hospital for a time.

Cybersecurity Team

Harris is a part of a team that oversees cybersecurity at the department, an issue that the House oversight panel looked into in November. The committee found that while the department holds 139 million Social Security numbers, it is “vulnerable to security threats,” according to an Inspector General’s report. The department’s system also failed a key part of a test performed as part of an audit.

Harris—who is a career civil servant, not an Obama administration appointee—was investigated for the tax issues by the IG a few years ago, he told the committee, according to prepared testimony.

In written testimony, Harris also said he didn’t help a relative get a job at the department, just inquired to see if there were positions available. He also said he didn’t use his influence to get a friend a contracting position. And he’s refiled his tax forms.

Harris has been counseled by the department about his actions, but isn’t expected to receive further punishment.

King said in prepared testimony that Harris’ actions reflect “a serious lack of judgment.” And even though King’s predecessors had already taken action, King also talked to Harris about these “serious matters.” Harris, he said, “expressed profound remorse” for his actions.

Committee Pushback

But that didn’t fly with some lawmakers.

“It’s your leadership that’s on the line. Is it appropriate to have outside income and not report it?” Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, the chairman of the committee, asked King.

And at least one Democrat wasn’t satisfied with King’s answers.

“Where’s the stick as opposed to just the pat? How do people know that they can’t be involved in this behavior?” asked Democrat Stacey Plaskett, the delegate from the Virgin Islands. “That’s just a way to keep your job.”

In response, King noted, “after the counseling, the activities ended” and that the department’s general counsel’s office had found no violation of law, regulation, or policy. He also said the department has “made tremendous progress” in the area of cybersecurity.

King is also facing challenges in other corners of Congress—Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., is unhappy that he hasn’t been officially confirmed. King has said it’s up to the president to decide whether to submit his nomination to the U.S. Senate. And he has noted that an acting secretary has all the same powers as one that’s been confirmed.

Assistant Editor Alyson Klein contributed to this article.

A version of this article appeared in the February 10, 2016 edition of Education Week as Ed. Dept. CIO Grilled By Oversight Panel

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Budget & Finance Webinar
The ABCs of ESSER: How to Make the Most of Relief Funds Before They Expire
Join a diverse group of K-12 experts to learn how to leverage federal funds before they expire and improve student learning environments.
Content provided by Johnson Controls
Science K-12 Essentials Forum How To Teach STEM Problem Solving Skills to All K-12 Students
Join experts for a look at how experts are integrating the teaching of problem solving and entrepreneurial thinking into STEM instruction.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Modernizing Principal Support: The Road to More Connected and Effective Leaders
When principals are better equipped to lead, support, and maintain high levels of teaching and learning, outcomes for students are improved.
Content provided by BetterLesson

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Education Funding What America Spends on K-12: The Latest Federal Snapshot
About 93 percent of K-12 spending came from state and local sources in 2019-20—but more-recent year totals will reflect federal relief aid.
2 min read
Education Funding Opinion How You Can Avoid Missing Out on COVID Relief Money
We’re losing the race against the clock to spend ESSER funds, but there are solutions.
Erin Covington
3 min read
Illustration of cash dangling from line and hand trying to grasp it.
F. Sheehan for Education Week/Getty
Education Funding K-12 Infrastructure Is Broken. Here's Biden's Newest Plan to Help Fix It
School districts will, among other things, be able to apply for $500 million in U.S. Department of Energy grants for HVAC improvements.
2 min read
Image of an excavator in front of a school building.
iStock/Getty
Education Funding Less Funding, Less Representation: What a Historic Undercount of Latinos Means for Schools
Experts point to wide-ranging implications, including how much federal funding schools with large Latino populations will get.
3 min read
Classroom with Latino boy.
Prostock-Studio/Getty