Find your next job fast at the Jan. 28 Virtual Career Fair. Register now.
Federal

Blueprint Drafted for Research to Aid American Indian Education

By Mary Ann Zehr — August 30, 2005 2 min read

Education researchers and Native American educators are drawing up a blueprint intended to guide research into interventions that will improve the academic achievement of American Indian students.

To obtain a copy of the research blueprint on American Indian education, e-mail Jonathan A. Levitt of the National Institutes of Health, at levittja@mail.nih.gov.

“Issues of language and culture make a difference in whether students are successful,” said William Demmert, an education professor at Western Washington University in Bellingham, who came up with the idea for the project. “We [Native Americans] believe research is important to understand what needs to be done.”

Mr. Demmert, who grew up in the Alaska Tlingit community, is a former director of education for the federal Bureau of Indian Affairs and a former education commissioner in Alaska.

He was among a group of about 50 researchers and American Indians who met here at the Department of Education on Aug. 17 to refine a draft that had been written after an initial meeting in March in Santa Fe, N.M. The project is being sponsored primarily by the Education Department and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, which is part of the National Institutes of Health.

The final blueprint is expected to be published in the fall 2006 issue of the Journal of American Indian Education, which is published by the Center for Indian Education at Arizona State University in Tempe.

The draft document calls for more studies using several national databases that for the first time have sufficient samples of American Indians to conduct fairly sophisticated statistical analyses of educational outcomes for that group. The results for the 2003 and 2005 National Assessment of Educational Progress, for example, for the first time contain reliable information about Native American students, according to researchers.

Next Steps

The blueprint calls for studies of how indigenous communities are using technology to support education and how its use might be expanded. It recommends more study of after-school activities and on how the lives of American Indian students outside of school affect their education.

In addition, the blueprint spells out some “next steps” for American Indian education, such as developing more high-quality prekindergarten programs that include parent education. It calls for the identification, study, and description of programs that are closing the achievement gap between Native Americans and other students and wide distribution of information about the programs.

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Branding Matters. Learn From the Pros Why and How
Learn directly from the pros why K-12 branding and marketing matters, and how to do it effectively.
Content provided by EdWeek Top School Jobs
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
How to Make Learning More Interactive From Anywhere
Join experts from Samsung and Boxlight to learn how to make learning more interactive from anywhere.
Content provided by Samsung
Teaching Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table With Education Week: How Educators Can Respond to a Post-Truth Era
How do educators break through the noise of disinformation to teach lessons grounded in objective truth? Join to find out.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Human Resources Manager
Madison, Wisconsin
One City Schools
Elementary Teacher - Scholars Academy
Madison, Wisconsin
One City Schools
Communications Officer
Chattanooga, Tennessee
Hamilton County Department of Education
Special Education Teacher
Chicago, Illinois
JCFS Chicago

Read Next

Federal Opinion Miguel Cardona Shows You Don't Have to Leave to Succeed
The new U.S. secretary of education nominee sends a hopeful message to students long told they must leave their neighborhoods to make a mark.
Roberto Padilla & Nancy Gutiérrez
5 min read
A diverse community of people tending small plots of plantings
Tasiania/iStock<br/>
Federal Opinion Miguel Cardona Deserves a Chance to Prove His Mettle
Miguel Cardona's lack of a paper trail means most of us don’t yet know enough about him to make an informed judgment. That's fine.
4 min read
Image shows a multi-tailed arrow hitting the bullseye of a target.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty
Federal Biden Signs Executive Order to Boost Food Benefits for Children Missing School Meals
The order is designed to extend nutritional benefits that his administration says would benefit children.
2 min read
The Washington family receives free meals at Dillard High School amid the virus outbreak and school closings on March 16, 2020, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
A family receives free meals at Dillard High School amid the coronavirus outbreak and school closings on March 16, 2020, in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Brynn Anderson/AP
Federal How Biden's Data Mandate Could Help Schools Navigate the COVID-19 Crisis
An executive order directs the Education Department to collect data on issues like whether schools offer in-person learning.
4 min read
President Joe Biden signs executive orders after speaking about the coronavirus, accompanied by Vice President Kamala Harris, left, and Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, right, in the State Dinning Room of the White House, on Jan. 21, 2021, in Washington.
President Joe Biden signs executive orders after speaking about the coronavirus, accompanied by Vice President Kamala Harris, left, and Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, right, at the White House, on Jan. 21.
Alex Brandon/AP