School Climate & Safety Video

School Police: What’s Their Role? How Should They Treat Students?

January 25, 2017 6:13

A new analysis of federal civil rights data by Education Week finds black students are more likely to attend schools with police officers present, and three times more likely to be arrested on campus than their white peers. In Minnesota, the St. Paul school district revamped its school policing program to focus less on enforcement and more on student relationships. This video aired on PBS NewsHour on January 24, 2017

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