School & District Management News in Brief

Urban School Chiefs’ Tenure Falls Off, Survey Finds

By Madeline Will — November 11, 2014 1 min read

The average time that urban superintendents stay on the job dropped this year, new survey results show.

Nationwide, the average tenure is now 3.2 years, a dip downward from what had been an uptick over several years, the survey conducted by the Council of the Great City Schools found. The survey—for the 2013-14 school year—includes responses from 53 of the group’s 66 members, among the nation’s largest school systems. The average tenure for urban schools chiefs had grown from 2.8 years in 2003 to 3.6 years in 2010.

The slight decrease was attributed to significant turnover in 2013-14. So far, it appears the churn will continue for the current academic year. Notable examples include John Deasy from Los Angeles; Winston Brooks from Albuquerque, N.M.; Craig Witherspoon from Birmingham, Ala.; and Heath Morrison from Charlotte-Mecklenburg, N.C.

A version of this article appeared in the November 12, 2014 edition of Education Week as Urban School Chiefs’ Tenure Falls Off, Survey Finds

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