School Climate & Safety

State Journal

November 08, 2000 1 min read

Horror stories

Utah news outlets received a scary delivery last week from the Utah Education Association.

The state affiliate of the National Education Association highlighted some examples of inadequate or outdated textbooks and other supplies, gathered through an informal survey, by stuffing Halloween baskets with selected “scary facts” about school supplies and shipping them off to members of the state news media on Oct. 30.

The organization cited a 1950 world map at one elementary school, encyclopedias from 1966 in another, light fixtures in one classroom that leak water when it rains, and a 1920s-vintage alto saxophone used by a middle school band.

“There is an overarching need for new textbooks and new supplies in Utah schools,” said UEA President Phyllis Sorensen.

In response to earlier reports of insufficient school supplies, the Utah legislature had called on legislative Auditor General Wayne Welsh last spring to assess the state of textbooks and class sizes in public schools. A report on the results of a subsequent survey was slated for release in early November, but Mr. Welsh now says it will be unveiled later this month or in December.

“Why they’re holding back the data, we don’t know,” the union’s Ms. Sorensen said. “We suspect it will confirm all of our worst fears and more.”

But Mr. Welsh said the survey results were not being intentionally withheld. “We’ve been working as hard as we can,” he said. “It’s a long and complex audit.”

—Jessica L. Sandham jsandham@epe.org

A version of this article appeared in the November 08, 2000 edition of Education Week

Events

Jobs The EdWeek Top School Jobs Virtual Career Fair
Find teaching jobs and other jobs in K-12 education at the EdWeek Top School Jobs virtual career fair.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Curriculum Webinar
How to Power Your Curriculum With Digital Books
Register for this can’t miss session looking at best practices for utilizing digital books to support their curriculum.
Content provided by OverDrive
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Well-Being Webinar
Embracing Student Engagement: The Pathway to Post-Pandemic Learning
As schools emerge from remote learning, educators are understandably worried about content and skills that students would otherwise have learned under normal circumstances. This raises the very real possibility that children will face endless hours
Content provided by Newsela

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

School Climate & Safety Spotlight Spotlight on Safe Reopening
In this Spotlight, review how your district can strategically apply its funding, and how to help students safely bounce back, plus more.

School Climate & Safety Video A Year of Activism: Students Reflect on Their Fight for Racial Justice at School
Education Week talks to three students about their year of racial justice activism, what they learned, and where they are headed next.
4 min read
Tay Andwerson, front center, Denver School Board at-large director, leads demonstrators through Civic Center Park on a march to City Park to call for more oversight of the police Sunday, June 7, 2020, in Denver.
Tay Andwerson, front center, Denver School Board at-large director, leads demonstrators through Civic Center Park on a march to City Park to call for more oversight of the police Sunday, June 7, 2020, in Denver.
David Zalubowski/AP
School Climate & Safety Interactive Which Districts Have Cut School Policing Programs?
Which districts have taken steps to reduce their school policing programs or eliminate SRO positions? And what do those districts' demographics look like? Find out with Education Week's new interactive database.
A police officer walks down a hall inside a school
Collage by Vanessa Solis/Education Week (images: Michael Blann/Digital/Vision; Kristen Prahl/iStock/Getty Images Plus )
School Climate & Safety These Districts Defunded Their School Police. What Happened Next?
Six profiles of districts illustrate the tensions, successes, and concerns that have accompanied the changes they've made to their school police programs over the last year.
Deering High School in Portland, Maine, one of two schools to have their SROs removed.
Deering High School in Portland, Maine, one of two schools to have their SROs removed.
Ryan David Brown for Education Week