Student Well-Being News in Brief

Senate Panel Approves Epinephrine Legislation

By Alyson Klein — November 05, 2013 1 min read
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A bill approved by the U.S. Senate education committee last week would give states an extra incentive to help treat students with anaphylaxis or severe allergic reactions.

Under the bipartisan legislation, which was approved by the House in July, states that adopt policies to make epinephrine available in schools would get a leg up in securing federal grants for addressing asthma.

So far, 16 states have enacted laws this year making it easier for schools to stock epinephrine (one well-known brand is EpiPen), according to the Associated Press, and 11 already had such laws.

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A version of this article appeared in the November 07, 2013 edition of Education Week as Senate Panel Approves Epinephrine Legislation

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