Equity & Diversity News in Brief

School on Indian Reservation to Scrap ‘Midget’ Mascot

By The Associated Press — September 29, 2015 1 min read
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A South Dakota school district on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation is abandoning its midget nickname and mascot because it is offensive to little people.

McLaughlin school board President Juliana White Bull-Taken Alive said the nonprofit group Little People of America recently reached out to the district asking for the change. She said there was not much opposition.

The American Indian community has long asked school districts and professional sports teams with names and mascots that it finds offensive to change them.

A version of this article appeared in the September 30, 2015 edition of Education Week as School on Indian Reservation to Scrap ‘Midget’ Mascot

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