School & District Management State of the States

Primary School Setting Underscores Agenda

By Christina A. Samuels — January 20, 2006 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

• Utah
• Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr.

Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr.

Gov. Jon Huntsman Jr. used an elementary school a few miles north of the Utah Capitol as the backdrop for his Jan. 17 State of the State Address, which included calls for a stronger education system along with tax changes and an improved transportation system.

Mr. Huntsman, a Republican in his second year as governor, said he thought it appropriate for lawmakers to gather at Washington Elementary School in Bountiful, Utah, “to share a vision of a future where we work together to build a hopeful foundation for Utah’s next generation.”

Read a complete transcript of Gov. Jon Huntsman, Jr.'s 2006 State of the State address. Posted by Utah’s Office of the Governor.

Finance: As part of that foundation, Mr. Huntsman called for a 5.5 percent increase in the amount of money the state spends on each student. Utah’s per-pupil spending is the lowest in the nation—even when adjusted for regional cost differences—at $5,067, according to Education Week’s Quality Counts 2006. The national average, according to the report, was $8,041.

Mr. Huntsman said it was also important to inspire a lifetime love of learning in students. To do that, early education is crucial, he said. He proposed a $7 million voluntary all-day-kindergarten program in Title I schools, such as Washington Elementary. “Our students who desire extra assistance need it early in their academic careers,” he said.

Math and Science: Mr. Huntsman also focused on teachers. He said he would seek funding to enhance teacher training and incentives in mathematics and science for teachers of the 4th, 5th, and 6th grades. “Just as students in early grades need to master reading, children who are preparing to enter junior high school need to master the basic fundamentals of math and science,” he said.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the January 25, 2006 edition of Education Week

Events

School Climate & Safety K-12 Essentials Forum Strengthen Students’ Connections to School
Join this free event to learn how schools are creating the space for students to form strong bonds with each other and trusted adults.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Reading & Literacy Webinar
Creating Confident Readers: Why Differentiated Instruction is Equitable Instruction
Join us as we break down how differentiated instruction can advance your school’s literacy and equity goals.
Content provided by Lexia Learning
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
IT Infrastructure & Management Webinar
Future-Proofing Your School's Tech Ecosystem: Strategies for Asset Tracking, Sustainability, and Budget Optimization
Gain actionable insights into effective asset management, budget optimization, and sustainable IT practices.
Content provided by Follett Learning

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

School & District Management Q&A How K-12 Leaders Can Better Manage Divisive Curriculum and Culture War Debates
The leader of an effort to equip K-12 leaders with conflict resolution skills urges relationship-building—and knowing when to disengage.
7 min read
Katy Anthes, Commissioner of Education in Colorado from 2016- 2023, participates in a breakout session during the Education Week Leadership Symposium on May 3, 2024.
Katy Anthes, who served as commissioner of education in Colorado from 2016-2023, participates in a breakout session during the Education Week Leadership Symposium on May 3, 2024. Anthes specializes in helping school district leaders successfully manage politically charged conflicts.
Chris Ferenzi for Education Week
School & District Management Virginia School Board Restores Confederate Names to 2 Schools
The vote reverses a decision made in 2020 as dozens of schools nationwide dropped Confederate figures from their names.
2 min read
A statue of confederate general Stonewall Jackson is removed on July 1, 2020, in Richmond, Va. Shenandoah County, Virginia's school board voted 5-1 early Friday, May 10, 2024, to rename Mountain View High School as Stonewall Jackson High School and Honey Run Elementary as Ashby Lee Elementary four years after the names had been removed.
A statue of confederate general Stonewall Jackson is removed on July 1, 2020, in Richmond, Va. Shenandoah County, Virginia's school board voted 5-1 early Friday, May 10, 2024, to rename Mountain View High School as Stonewall Jackson High School and Honey Run Elementary as Ashby Lee Elementary four years after the names had been removed.
Steve Helber/AP
School & District Management Quiz Quiz Yourself: How Much Do You Know About the School District Technology Leader?
The tech director at school districts is a key player when it comes to purchasing. Test your knowledge of this key buyer persona and see how your results stack up with your peers.
School & District Management Deepfakes Expose Public School Employees to New Threats
The only protection for school leaders is a healthy dose of skepticism.
7 min read
Signage is shown outside on the grounds of Pikesville High School, May 2, 2012, in Baltimore County, Md. The most recent criminal case involving artificial intelligence emerged in late April 2024, from the Maryland high school, where police say a principal was framed as racist by a fake recording of his voice.
Police say a principal was framed making racist remarks through a fake recording of his voice at Pikesville High School, a troubling new use of AI that could affect more educators. A sign announces the entrance to the Baltimore County, Md., school on May 2, 2012.
Lloyd Fox/The Baltimore Sun via AP