School Climate & Safety News in Brief

Pediatricians Criticize Harsh Discipline Codes

By Nirvi Shah — March 05, 2013 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

Schools are too quick to suspend students or expel them and need to take a hard look at those “drastic” policies, the American Academy of Pediatrics said last week, building on a previous position paper published six years ago that questioned zero-tolerance discipline policies.

The newest statement also outlines ways pediatricians can help identify and intervene if children have behavior problems, and instructs children’s doctors to champion policies that emphasize prevention strategies and alternatives to out-of-school suspension and expulsion.

The 60,000-member academy says discipline policies that call for ejecting students from school have been shown not to improve school safety, but the effect on students can be profound.

To prevent behavior problems from arising and reduce the use of suspension and expulsion, the group recommends early identification of at-risk children, intervention before problem behaviors occur, and implementation of clearly articulated and carefully taught age-appropriate codes of conduct with stated alternatives.

Related Tags:

A version of this article appeared in the March 06, 2013 edition of Education Week as Pediatricians Criticize Harsh Discipline Codes

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Budget & Finance Webinar
The ABCs of ESSER: How to Make the Most of Relief Funds Before They Expire
Join a diverse group of K-12 experts to learn how to leverage federal funds before they expire and improve student learning environments.
Content provided by Johnson Controls
Science K-12 Essentials Forum How To Teach STEM Problem Solving Skills to All K-12 Students
Join experts for a look at how experts are integrating the teaching of problem solving and entrepreneurial thinking into STEM instruction.
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
School & District Management Webinar
Modernizing Principal Support: The Road to More Connected and Effective Leaders
When principals are better equipped to lead, support, and maintain high levels of teaching and learning, outcomes for students are improved.
Content provided by BetterLesson

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

School Climate & Safety Onlookers Urged Police to Charge Into Texas School
“Go in there! Go in there!” women shouted at the officers soon after the attack began, according to a witness.
6 min read
People walk with flowers to honor the victims in Tuesday's shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas.
People walk with flowers to honor the victims in Tuesday's shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas.
Jae C. Hong/AP
School Climate & Safety How Much Trauma Can Our Schools Withstand?
Despite a cascade of tragedy, educators report to work and care for our children. How do they get through it?
5 min read
Kladys Castellón prays during a vigil for the victims of a mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, on Tuesday, May 24, 2022.
Kladys Castellón prays during a vigil for the victims of a mass shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas.
Billy Calzada/The San Antonio Express-News via AP
School Climate & Safety 'This Could Be Our School': Educators Grapple With Anger and Loss After Uvalde Shooting
While some students seemed blissfully unaware of the Texas school shooting, some educators worried about their safety.
Three and 4-year-old students in Kim Manning's early childhood education class at Traylor Academy in Denver, Colo., listen to a discussion about school safety on Wednesday, May 25, 2022, after the Robb Elementary School shooting in Uvalde, Texas.
Three and 4-year-olds in in an early-childhood class at Traylor Academy in Denver listen to a discussion about school safety after the Robb Elementary School shooting in Uvalde, Texas.
Courtesy of Kim Manning Ursetta
School Climate & Safety After Texas School Shooting, a Familiar Fight About How to Make Schools Safe
Lawmakers, advocates, and the public once again debate how to make "never again" a reality.
7 min read
Two Texas Troopers light a candle at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, Wednesday. Desperation turned to heart-wrenching sorrow for families of grade schoolers killed after an 18-year-old gunman barricaded himself in their Texas classroom and began shooting, killing several fourth-graders and their teachers.
Two Texas Troopers light a candle at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, a day after 19 children and two teachers were killed by a gunman in their school.
Jae C. Hong/AP