Student Well-Being News in Brief

Most Calif. Students Fail to Meet Fitness Goals

By McClatchy-Tribune — December 05, 2011 1 min read
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Adding more fuel to arguments that California children need to ditch the TV in favor of more athletic pursuits, a report released last week shows that fewer than one-third of students meet state fitness goals.

“Today’s results are clear,” said schools chief Tom Torlakson in a news release. “When only 31 percent of children are physically fit, that’s a public-health challenge we can’t wait to address.”

The state tests students in grades 5, 7, and 9 in six areas: aerobic capacity, abdominal strength, upper-body strength, trunk strength, flexibility, and body-fat composition. The goal is for students to meet fitness standards in all six areas to prevent against diseases that can result from inactivity.

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A version of this article appeared in the December 07, 2011 edition of Education Week as Most Calif. Students Fail to Meet Fitness Goals

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