Budget & Finance

Mo. House OKs Bill Sparing Some Schools From Cuts

By The Associated Press — March 18, 2010 1 min read
  • Save to favorites
  • Print

The Missouri House endorsed legislation Wednesday that would shield more than one-quarter of Missouri’s public school districts from a midyear funding cut caused by state budget troubles.

Declining state revenues prompted Gov. Jay Nixon to conclude Missouri wouldn’t have enough money to make midyear payments to districts totaling $43 million. The payments weren’t included in the state’s budget but were called for under its school financing formula.

The Department of Elementary and Secondary Education had planned to divide the shortfall among all 523 school districts. But legislation given first-round House approval exempts about 150 districts from funding reductions. The bill needs another vote to move to the Senate.

The exemption would go to districts that didn’t benefit from an increase in state aid under the funding formula developed in 2005. They include the state’s two largest districts of St. Louis and Kansas City, as well as some of the largest suburban districts and a mixture of small, rural districts.

But many rural lawmakers contend the legislation unfairly leaves some school districts absorbing budget cuts that should be shared by all. The House rejected 83-73 an amendment that would have split the funding cut among all districts.

Rep. Rachel Bringer, who represents a relatively rural area in northeast Missouri, pointed to a map showing the state’s school districts to highlight her point that wealthier districts were getting a boost at the expense of others. Bringer referred several times to schools in the St. Louis suburb of Kirkwood, which she said spends twice as much per student as some rural schools.

“It’s just completely adding insult to injury to ask the rural districts that are on the formula to take the cut that the districts that should have been cut years ago refuse to take today,” said Bringer, D-Palmyra.

Rep. Rick Stream, a Republican who served more than a decade on the school board in Kirkwood, said residents chose to pay more in local taxes to help their schools. They did not benefit from the funding increases that went to most schools under the state financing formula, he said.

Associated Press Writer Chris Blank wrote this report.

Related Tags:

Copyright 2010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
IT Infrastructure & Management Webinar
From Chaos to Clarity: How to Master EdTech Management and Future-Proof Your Evaluation Processes
The road to a thriving educational technology environment is paved with planning, collaboration, and effective evaluation.
Content provided by Instructure
Special Education Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table - Special Education: Proven Interventions for Academic Success
Special education should be a launchpad, not a label. Join the conversation on how schools can better support ALL students.
Special Education K-12 Essentials Forum Innovative Approaches to Special Education
Join this free virtual event to explore innovations in the evolving landscape of special education.

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Budget & Finance 3 Ways Districts Can Prepare for Financial Woes to Come
ESSER dollars are expiring soon, leaving districts to get creative with resources in future years.
4 min read
Hand putting together puzzle blocks with people icons.
iStock/Getty
Budget & Finance Districts Scramble to Comply With New Overtime Rule
Organizations push to delay new rule that requires overtime pay for more school employees.
2 min read
Illustration of woman turning back hands on clock.
Education Week + iStock / Getty Images Plus Week
Budget & Finance Why Chronic Absenteeism Is a Budget Problem, Too
Chronic absenteeism has serious academic consequences. It also comes with a price tag.
7 min read
Illustration of empty school desks with scissors cutting 100 dollar bill.
F. Sheehan for Education Week + iStock / Getty Images Plus
Budget & Finance How to Build Voter Support for School Bonds: 5 Tips
A ‘steady drumbeat of communication’ with lots of detailed information go a long way, district leaders say.
5 min read
Conceptual illustration of Newton's Cradle: 4 balls on strings and one ball is pulled back and swinging towards other three. The one pulled back represents money and has a dollar sign on it.
Wenmei Zhou/DigitalVision Vectors/Getty