School Climate & Safety News in Brief

Many Portland Schools Have Lead in Water

By Corey Mitchell — June 07, 2016 1 min read
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The Portland, Ore., public schools failed to disclose that the drinking water at dozens of schools had elevated lead levels, the Williamette Week newspaper reports.

Tests conducted from 2010 to 2012 found that 47 district buildings had lead levels that exceeded national guidelines, according to a database obtained by the newspaper.

After the paper emailed those test results to district leaders, they shut down drinking fountains at all its schools last month for the remainder of the school year.

District leaders said they were not aware of the test results. The district’s environmental director did not respond to questions from the newspaper. –COREY MITCHELL

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A version of this article appeared in the June 08, 2016 edition of Education Week as Many Portland Schools Have Lead in Water

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