Student Achievement

In Texas Gubernatorial Showdown, Dispute Over Dropouts

April 12, 2010 1 min read

High school dropouts in Texas have taken center stage in Democrat Bill White’s campaign to unseat Republican Gov. Rick Perry.

For several days, White, the former mayor of Houston, has been hammering away at Perry for downplaying the state’s high school dropout rate. White says three out of every 10 students don’t graduate from high school or receive a GED within four years and that Perry uses discredited figures to show higher rates of high school graduation. Perry’s campaign has mostly responded by saying that White’s dropout calculations are inaccurate.

(According to our colleagues in the Editorial Projects in Education Research Center, Texas’ graduation rate in 2006 was 65.3 percent. Click here to see for yourselves.)

White has pledged to talk about the dropout issue everywhere he campaigns, which, if he does, will be a boon to the educators and advocates who are struggling to keep more students on the path to high school graduation.

Let’s ask our Texan friends: Will the dropout issue gain and keep traction with voters? Will White keep it as a central theme to his campaign?

A version of this news article first appeared in the State EdWatch blog.

Events

This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Classroom Technology Webinar
Educator-Driven EdTech Design: Help Shape the Future of Classroom Technology
Join us for a collaborative workshop where you will get a live demo of GoGuardian Teacher, including seamless new integrations with Google Classroom, and participate in an interactive design exercise building a feature based on
Content provided by GoGuardian
School & District Management Live Online Discussion A Seat at the Table With Education Week: What Did We Learn About Schooling Models This Year?
After a year of living with the pandemic, what schooling models might we turn to as we look ahead to improve the student learning experience? Could year-round schooling be one of them? What about online
School & District Management Webinar What's Ahead for Hybrid Learning: Putting Best Practices in Motion
It’s safe to say hybrid learning—a mix of in-person and remote instruction that evolved quickly during the pandemic—is probably here to stay in K-12 education to some extent. That is the case even though increasing

EdWeek Top School Jobs

Teacher Jobs
Search over ten thousand teaching jobs nationwide — elementary, middle, high school and more.
View Jobs
Principal Jobs
Find hundreds of jobs for principals, assistant principals, and other school leadership roles.
View Jobs
Administrator Jobs
Over a thousand district-level jobs: superintendents, directors, more.
View Jobs
Support Staff Jobs
Search thousands of jobs, from paraprofessionals to counselors and more.
View Jobs

Read Next

Student Achievement 3 Studies for District Leaders to Read as They Plan for Learning Recovery
How can districts plan for programs that help catch up students affected academically by the pandemic? These three studies provide clues.
4 min read
26extendresearch 1209998304 blue
iStock/Getty
Student Achievement Where Can We Find Lots of Tutors? Bill in Congress Would Deploy Teachers-in-Training
A bipartisan proposal in the Senate eyes teacher-candidates as a promising source to help districts scale up intensive tutoring programs.
4 min read
Tutoring cost rising
E+/Getty
This content is provided by our sponsor. It is not written by and does not necessarily reflect the views of Education Week's editorial staff.
Sponsor
Student Achievement Whitepaper
Expert Research: How Severe Is Unfinished Learning?
This recently released report offers the first large-scale look at how the pandemic has impacted learning across all students, widened ex...
Content provided by Curriculum Associates
Student Achievement Opinion What Does COVID-19 Learning Loss Actually Mean?
COVID-19 learning loss is a big topic. Unfortunately, there has been limited discussion on specifically what is being lost.
Tommy Thompson
6 min read
Image shows a speech bubble divided into 4 overlapping, connecting parts.
DigitalVision Vectors/Getty and Laura Baker/Education Week